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Posts Tagged ‘Treaty of Waitangi’

Radio NZ: Focus on Politics for 7 February 2014

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– Focus on Politics –

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– Friday 7 February 2014  –

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– Chris Bramwell –

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A weekly analysis of significant political issues.

Friday after 6:30pm and Saturday at 5:10pm

Politicians converging on Waitangi Marae this year were given a relatively easy run, with a noisy but respectful protest, and a few fish dropped at the Prime Minister’s feet. History was made though – with women allowed to speak on the marae for the first time, 15 years after the former Labour Party leader Helen Clark was refused permission to speak.

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Radio NZ logo - Focus on Politics

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Click to listen: Focus on Politics for 7 February 2014 ( 17′ 36″ )

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Acknowledgement: Radio NZ

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Dear Leader – shoots from the lip. Again.

4 February 2014 4 comments

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Once again, Dear Leader has passed judgement on an issue;

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Jeers for Governor-General at Waitangi

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At 3.33pm, The NZ Herald reported Key as saying,

Having a few protesters or radicals effectively jostling the Governor-General is undignified, it’s unwarranted and, frankly, outright wrong.”

That’s despite  Governor-General, Sir Jerry Mateparae, stating via Twitter that he had not been jostled. Note the time;

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governor general - waitangi day - john key

Source: Twitter – Governor General of NZ

Hat Tip: The Daily Blog: Will msm grill Key over misleading Waitangi comments the way they did Cunliffe’s Best Start?

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Finally, by late afternoon, Key was forced to admit that his condemnation was  based on incorrect information;

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PM backs away from Waitangi comments

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The damage, though,  was done and many New Zealanders will have heard only the words “Waitangi”, “Governor General”; “jostled”; and “protestors” and reaffirmed their preconceived prejudices.

Racists and other right-wing nutjobs will be feasting on the carcass of this media-beat-up and Key’s ill-considered, rush-to-judgement. But then, the media love Waitangi Day for the headline-generating stories and advertising it sells, and for politicians – it’s Election Year.

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References

The Daily Blog: Will msm grill Key over misleading Waitangi comments the way they did Cunliffe’s Best Start?

Radio NZ: Jeers for Governor-General at Waitangi

NZ Herald: Waitangi celebrations start with scuffle

Radio NZ: PM backs away from Waitangi comments

Twitter – Governor General of NZ

Additional

Fairfax media: PM’s comments called overblown

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Above image acknowledgment: Francis Owen

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Citizen A – 13 September 2012 – Online now!

19 September 2012 Leave a comment

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Citizen A

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– 13 September 2012 –

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– Claudette Hauiti & Phoebe Fletcher –

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZTu0zW1FPVc&list=UU7Jit_xt-bd0g_Z8CIneUeg&index=1&feature=plcp

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Issue 1: Feeding kids at school – everyone seems to want to do it except the Government – who is responsible for hungry children – the parent or the State?

Issue 2: Latest round of beneficiary cut backs now look to punish the child for the sins of the parent – has Paula Bennett gone too far or will she go further?

Issue 3: Maori meet to hui over water today, is the Prime Minister listening?

Citizen A broadcasts 7pm Thursday Triangle TV – This blogger recommends ‘Citizen A’ as intelligent analysis of current affairs.

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Acknowledgement (republished with kind permission)

Tumeke

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Is John Key ‘losing the plot’?!

18 September 2012 3 comments

Lifted from the media today,

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Full story

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When the Leader of the pro-capitalist National Party starts talking about “nationalising elements such as water and wind”  – whilst at the same time instigating a programme to partially privatise Genesis Energy, Mighty River Power, and Meridian – the question has to be asked; has John Key flipped his lid?!?!

Regardless of whatever atmosphere they are breathing on the Ninth Floor, there must be some severe oxygen depletion at work to have affected Key’s mental processes so badly.

New Zealanders from both ends of the spectrum, Left and Right, as well as the general populace, must be wondering what is going on in the land of Planet National.

Right wing National supporters must’ve wondered if they had heard their Dear Leader correctly when he uttered the taboo “N” word (“nationalisation – not “n—-r”).

The Left would have been rolling their eyes and shaking their heads in dismay, and wondering, “How much more of this clown will the public take? Does he have to decapitate and eat a kitten before his popularity takes a nose-dive and drops lower than John Banks’ credibility?”

Nationalisation of water and air…

Whilst selling of our state assets at the same time…

The breath-taking audacity of the man.

In reality, what he is saying is that  the government is toying with the idea  of making a grab for certain natural resources – before selling them to private investors.

His comment is as ludicrous as his statement on TVNZ’s Q+A on 16 September when he dumbly blurted out,

… So if you accept that viewpoint, then I think you have to accept that elements like water and wind and the sun and air and fire and all these things, and the sea, along with natural resources like oil and gas, are there for the national interest of everyone. They’re there for the benefit of all New Zealanders, not one particular group over another. “

See: TVNZ Q+A Interview with Prime Minister John Key

Yeah, right, Dear Leader. I’m sure that came as a bit of a surprise to the private oil and gas companies currently exploiting our gas and oil fields.

John Key – always a laugh a minute with his incredibly outrageous remarks. Unfortunately, his clownish behaviour is ultimately at our expense.

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water rights state asset sales waitangi tribunal Maori King SOEs John Key

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A lesson in Energy Economics

17 September 2012 Leave a comment

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This is the Treaty of Waitangi, signed by most tribes in New Zealand, and by the Representative of Her Majesty, Lieutenant-Governor, William Hobson,

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The full English text can be read here: Treaty of Waitangi.

The relevant part to the treaty, guaranteeing rights to land, forests, water, mountain, etc, is this bit, Article 2,

Article the second [Article 2]

Her Majesty the Queen of England confirms and guarantees to the Chiefs and Tribes of New Zealand and to the respective families and individuals thereof the full exclusive and undisturbed possession of their Lands and Estates Forests Fisheries and other properties which they may collectively or individually possess so long as it is their wish and desire to retain the same in their possession; but the Chiefs of the United Tribes and the individual Chiefs yield to Her Majesty the exclusive right of Preemption over such lands as the proprietors thereof may be disposed to alienate at such prices as may be agreed upon between the respective Proprietors and persons appointed by Her Majesty to treat with them in that behalf.

Seems fairly clear; what’s theirs is theirs and no nicking each others’ stuff.

Now, unfortunately, I have fellow New Zealanders who hold to the belief that the Treaty of Waitangi is “no longer relevant” or is “outdated”.

Interesting idea that; “no longer relevant”.

Firstly, the Treaty has no “expiry date” or “statute of limitations”. Nothing in the  small print  states that the Treaty is valid for only X number of years.

Secondly, imagine trying to tell our American cuzzies that their Declaration of Independence – signed in 1776AD, and therefore some 64 years older than our own Treaty – is “no longer relevant” or  “outdated”? They’d have half their US Marines camped outside your front door – and not in a happy way, either.

And of course, there is the Magna Carta, signed in 1215AD, and which is the basis of much of our modern law.  If the Magna Carta is “no longer relevant” or  “outdated” then we are in serious trouble, as the state would have arbitrary powers of detention and imprisonment without right of trial, and we would lose other legal protections from State abuse.

And then there are the Ten Commandments, several thousand years old, which state the most basic laws of a civilised society; no killing, no stealing, no false accusations, etc.

Few people would try to assert that these basic laws are “no longer relevant” or  “outdated”?

Time does not extinguish rights.

Those who object to the principles of the Treaty do so out of fear and misconceptions (and sometimes out of downright racist hostility) than any notions of fairness.

The Treaty is the basis upon which our ancestors agreed to live together and to respect each other. We should respect that agreement and use it in the spirit in which it was signed.

Otherwise we disrespect our forebears (on all sides) and do ourselves a dishonour in the  process.

Moving forward and onward…

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II

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In replying to Maori claims of water rights, Dear Leader John Key has stated earnestly that “no one owns the water”.

Until now,  Maori have made no claims over water in terms of this country’s energy production. With Meridian, Mighty River Power, and Genesis Energy under collective  state ownership, it could equally be said that “no one owned the power companies – they belonged to us all.

If, until now, we all benefitted from collective ownership of power companies, then, equally the source of that power was in collective ownership. Now National is attempting to privatise 49% of  Meridian, Mighty River Power, and Genesis Energy – effectively changing the rules.

The concept of private ownership is now contemplated for up-till-now collectively-owned assets. So what about the source of that power which will now benefit a small group who will own 49%?

Can the source of hydro power be owned, especially when it produces profits?

Let’s test that idea, shall we?

Simple question: who owns the following resources?

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Oil. Natural  gas. Coal. Uranium. None of this stuff  is free. Someone owns the ground or the process used to extract it.  There is a concept of private ownership  over these energy sources that can be quantified, measured, controlled,  priced, and sold.

Until Pakeha arrived on these fair shores as the second wave of  “boat people” – refugees from a class-stratified society – Maori had no concept of private ownership. Property was not owned by individuals. Iwi and hapu held collective kawanatanga over their lands, waters, forests, hills, seashores, etc.

Once Pakeha arrived, the notion of private ownership and Land Titles were introduced to Maori.

Some Pakeha might object – but water is sacred!

So is land. God knows enough of our young men have gone off to war to defend our nation; our people; our lands, from foreign domination, in two World Wars.

Some Pakeha would object – but water is ephemeral!

So are radio/television  frequencies. But that hasn’t stopped the government to leasing/selling those to private companies. (Try broadcasting on the same wavelength as TVNZ or TV3, and see what the reaction from those companies and the State would be.)

This is a hydro power station,

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Powered by this stuff,

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Water  generates the turbines which produces the power that is on-sold to consumers.

So how does water differ from oil, gas, coal, and uranium?

Private ownership?  It suited us Pakeha when it was used to our benefit to “acquire” land from Maori.

Maori learnt that lesson well and the shoe is now on the other foot.

If Pakeha are going to flog of 49% of  assets that, up till now, no one owned and collectively benefitted us all, then by the gods, Maori can – and should – apply precisely the same principle.

Welcome to the world of capitalism – our ‘gift’ to Maori

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III

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Pakeha schizophrenia over private ownership was nowhere better summed up than on TVNZ’s Q+A, on 16 September, when Shane Taurima interviewed Dear Leader John Key on this issue,

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In a stunning act of conversion to social democratic principles, John Key equated the collective ownership of water with oil and gas,

… So if you accept that viewpoint, then I think you have to accept that elements like water and wind and the sun and air and fire and all these things, and the sea, along with natural resources like oil and gas, are there for the national interest of everyone. They’re there for the benefit of all New Zealanders, not one particular group over another. “

See: TVNZ Q+A Interview with Prime Minister John Key

Really?!?!

JohnKey is telling us that, ” natural resources like oil and gas, are there for the national interest of everyone. They’re there for the benefit of all New Zealanders, not one particular group over another “?!?

Since when did National or Labour nationalise the oil and gas industry???

This little piece of news-trivia slipped by me, that’s for sure. (Must’ve been announced on the other TV channel when we wasted two minutes watching ‘The Ridges‘.)

It’s pure bullshit of course. John Key is spinning porkies when he’s suggesting that the oil and gas industry is ” there for the national interest of everyone “. These resources belong to various corporations – not ”  for the benefit of all New Zealanders “.

In fact, the last time New Zealand held any State ownership in any aspect of the oil and gas industry was  with Petrocorp and Maui gas – both  privatised, respectively, in 1988 and 1990.

See: Treasury – Income from State Asset Sales

John Key’s assertion that the oil and gas industry is ” there for the national interest of everyone ” is either delusional (spending too much time with John Banks?) or a clumsy fairytale to try to woo New Zealanders into a cosy, cotton-wool, fantasy world.

This blogger would welcome and support National nationalising all oil and gas production in this country, ”  for the benefit of all New Zealanders “.

The fact is that Dear Leader blew it.

Not only was his paradigm absurdly false – but it actually shored up the legitamacy of Maori claims over water rights.

If private ownership can be conferred over this country’s oil and gas resources, for the private benefit of shareholders, then John Key needs to explain – in far more truthful terms this time – why water is different.

This blogger  believes that so far he has made a complete hash of things.

More importantly, will a Court take a similar view?

My money is on Maori winning this one.

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An email sent to Dear Leader,

Date: Monday, 17 September 2012 12:11 AM
From: Frank Macskasy <fmacskasy@yahoo.com>
Reply-To: Frank Macskasy <fmacskasy@yahoo.com>
Subject: Nationalisation of oil and gas resources
To: John Key <john.key@parliament.govt.nz>
Cc: David Shearer <david.shearer@parliament.govt.nz>,
    Russel Norman <Russel.Norman@parliament.govt.nz>,
    Metiria Turei <metiria.turei@parliament.govt.nz>,
    Winston Peters <winston.peters@parliament.govt.nz>

Kia Ora Mr Key,
 
On 16 September, you stated on TVNZ’s Q+A the following statement,
” … So if you accept that viewpoint, then I think you have to accept that elements like water and wind and the sun and air and fire and all these things, and the sea, along with natural resources like oil and gas, are there for the national interest of everyone. They’re there for the benefit of all New Zealanders, not one particular group over another. “
 

Source:  http://tvnz.co.nz/q-and-a-news/interview-prime-minister-john-key-5085886

I missed the occassion when our oil and gas industries were nationalised, so that profits would remain in New Zealand,  “for the benefit of all New Zealanders, not one particular group over another”.

This is an excellent state of affairs and I welcome your government’s conversion to social democracy whereby  our ”  natural resources like oil and gas, are there for the national interest of everyone “.

I take it as a given then, that you have not only abandoned your asset sales programme, but will be re-nationalising Contact Energy.

In which case, it is a truism that “no one owns the oil and gas” in the ground, and subsequently these resources belong to all New Zealanders collectively.

I may have to reconsider my vote, come 2014, as I wish to support the newly discovered  social-democratic principles shown by your Party.

With regards,
-Frank Macskasy
Blogger

See: https://fmacskasy.wordpress.com/2012/09/17/a-lesson-in-energy-economics/

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Guest Author: Open Letter to the Prime Minister, by Hone Harawira

– Hone Harawira,
MP for Te Tai Tokerau
Leader, Mana Party

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Kia ora John

I’m down at Turangawaewae for the water hui, and I just wanted to clear up a few things before I go in.

You see John, there’s quite a bit of confusion about how Maori are being pushed to help you with your asset sales problem, but there doesn’t seem to be much of a push from your side to help Maori with any of our problems – like poverty, low wages, massive unemployment, poor housing, benefit cuts … you know the rest.

We know things are hard for your government right now, what with trying to sell off power companies when you don’t own the water that drives them – but really John, that’s something your officials should have sorted out a long time ago.

The consultation hui earlier this year showed clearly that Maori don’t support asset sales, there was that huge march on parliament against it, and there’s that petition on the street right now with 250,000 signatures and growing, opposing asset sales as well.

And you must have known John, that Maori would take action to protect their water rights under the Treaty of Waitangi.

That’s why Maori were so upset when you ridiculed the idea of a claim to the Waitangi Tribunal, then belittled the New Zealand Maori Council for daring to take the claim in the first place, and then said that the Tribunal wasn’t worth listening to anyway.

You see John, the Tribunal is one of the only avenues we have to present our claims in our own way. In fact it’s the only place where what our kaumatua and kuia have to say has any meaning. It’s deeply flawed of course, but it has a special place as the nation’s only specialist judicial body on Treaty issues.

That’s why when the Tribunal said that “government would be in breach of the Treaty if it proceeded with its asset sales programme before Maori water rights had been settled”, we really hoped that you might do the right thing and step back, take a deep breath, and let the judicial process run its course.

So when you decided to simply defer the sale, and engage in behind-closed-door deals with selected iwi leaders, you can imagine how … upset … we got.

Because this is an important issue John, to all of us.

This is about water, and in particular Maori interests in that water.

And water really is a taonga to us John, a treasure. It’s hard to explain in English but water is something to cherish, to care for, to respect and to protect for future generations. Moana Jackson says “every tribe has a river” and the people of Whanganui have a saying “I am the river and the river is me”. Water is part of who we are.

And Maori water rights need to be understood in that context John. Not as a tradeable commodity, but as part and parcel of our very existence. Even Pakeha people get that; I think that might be why so many of them oppose your asset sales too.

The Tribunal has confirmed those rights (with the support I might add, of a number of your own Crown witnesses), and the Council has quite rightly asked the Tribunal to consider the extent of those rights and how best to recognise them in stage two of the hearings.

That’s not to deny hapu and iwi their rightful claims to waterways in their territories, but the issue of Maori water rights calls for a nationwide discussion and commitment to standards and expectations far greater than what can be achieved by small groups meeting behind closed doors.

John, this is one of the biggest decisions Maori will ever make, and 5 weeks just isn’t enough time to do it justice.

So where do we go from here?

Well … if I were the Prime Minister John, I think I’d:

§ Set aside the asset sales programme for a while;

§ Give the Tribunal time to complete stage two of the hearings;

§ Give Maori time to go back and share all that information with our kaumatua and our kuia, our cousins, our kids, and yes even our mokos as well, because the decisions we make today will affect them and their mokos too. And time too for hapu and iwi to consider the wider implications for them as well;

§ Give the rest of the country time to give their views too; because on this issue, every New Zealander should have a say;

§ And then I’d call everyone back to the table in 12 months, and see if we could come up with a solution that works for all.

Anyway, gimme a bell some time and let’s have a cup of tea and a chat.

Yours sincerely,
Hone Harawira

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A temporary victory for common sense?!

2 August 2012 2 comments

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Full story

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Whoda thunk it – Maori saving New Zealand from the worst excesses of neo-liberalism.

And who would have thought that the Treaty of Waitangi – a 172 year old document – would be used  to preserve our state assets from being flogged of  by a Party that barely achieved 47.3% of the Party vote last year. National scored 1,058,636 votes out of a population of 4.4 million – not exactly a cast-iron mandate, but there you have it.

For some free marketeers, 1,058,636 trumps 4.4 million. No wonder so many finance companies went bust – they can’t count.

Most mind-numbingly depressing is that evidently many New Zealanders who voted for John Key and the National Party did so despite their opposition to asset sales.

Which really, when you think about it, is like going to a supermarket wanting  to buy a can of peaches; picking a can of Watties Beans instead; taking it home; opening it – and then expressing disappointment that the can doesn’t contain peaches.

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In all my life, I can’t say I’ve ever done that. Buying peaches and expecting beans…

When this blogger started passing the CIR petition to call for a referendum on the issue, the second and third signatories were two tradesmen. Both burly blokes who had voted National.

They almost grabbed at my pen to sign.

Guilt, I guess.

The Maori Council’s appeal to the Waitangi Tribunal has resulted in the Tribunal making a recommendation to postpone any and all asset sales, until water rights for Maori are resolved. This is no small matter.

Up till now, with water being used by state-owned enterprises, for the benefit of the entire country – Maori were content  to leave that precious  resource under State control/ownership.

It is only when National raised the ugly spectre of SOE privatisation that matters changed. All of a sudden – despite the water flowing through hydro-dams not being directly owned by the power companies – that resource was to be used to general private profit for private investors.

Screw that, thought Tangata Whenua and many fair-minded Tau Iwi.

And rightly so.

There is precedence here,

During the Second World War, the New Zealand Government took land from indigenous Māori owners by acquisition for the purpose of a military airfield. Instead of these being handed back to its former owners (the Tainui Awhiro peoples) when no longer required for defence purposes, part of the land, a 62-acre (250,000 m2) block was turned into a public Raglan golf course in 1969. “

Source

13 February 1988 is a day of thanksgiving and celebration for the return of Māori land. 25 hectares by the Raglan harbour was taken by the Crown for defence purposes during the Second World War. Later it became the Raglan golf course. Now it’s back in the hands of Tainui Awhiro people.

In 1978, seventeen Māori protesters were arrested on the golf course for trespass. Their court appearance set off a chain of events which trailed through the courts amidst bitter argument at local and national level, but finally led to the return of the land to local Māori people. The golf course has been re-sited in the hills overlooking Raglan.

In 1988, more than a thousand people gather to remember those who fought for what they considered a triumph over injustice. “

Source

Whilst the land was used in the defence of the nation, Maori were prepared to tolerate the State “acquiring” (ie, confiscating) it.

But once the war was over,  Maori had a reasonable expectation that it be returned to them. Instead, the pakeha state gave it to the Raglan Golf Club, and Maori had to fight through the Courts to have was was rightfully theirs, returned to them.

I doubt if any redneck pakeha would tolerate his or her house been confiscated by the State, without compensation, and later on-sold to developers.

The same can be said of water. Maori were prepared to share this resource with all of New Zealand.

But once National decided to sell four power companies, this changed the entire management/benefits dynamics. As our American cuzzies put it;  “it’s a whole new ball game, Jethro!”.

There are, unfortunately, a sizeable number of pakeha who say that “no one owns the water”.

Really?

Have a look at your local body rates bill. Notice how much you’re paying for water “no one owns”?

And isn’t it funny that until Pakeha rocked up onto the shores of the Land of The Long White Cloud, Maori had no concept of private ownership? An Iwi or hapu had sovereignty over an area of land and waterways – but no one  person owned anything. It was all communal.

Enter boatloads of pakeha and their alien notion of “private property”.

Suddenly, land was owned by individuals.

Maori were expected to get used to this alien concept. In fact, they had little choice, and to their credit they adapted well to the Pakeha system. They also realised the power of the Courts and the legal system – another pakeha construct.

Maori are now using the Courts (a pakeha system) to gain ownership (a pakeha notion) over waterways. The Treaty (a pakeha instrument) is their contract with the Crown (a pakeha hierarchical institution) that guarantees Maori undisturbed possession of their “treasures” (assets).

And all of a sudden, pakeha are claiming collective ownership of water?!

Talk about trying to change the rules half-way through the game!

Once this issue hits the Court system, expect delays as the case drags through the High Court, then Court of Appeal, then Supreme Court. It could be a very, very drawn out process.

In which case, Maori and a 172 year old document may have stymied the theft of our State assets. Just as the Treaty was designed to stop the theft of Maori assets.

Funny, how things turn out for the good.

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