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Citizens march against TPPA in Wellington, send message to National govt: “Yeah, nah!”

21 November 2015 3 comments

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TPPA - stand up it's not over

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NZ, Wellington, 14 November – Tertiary Education Union national president and veteran anti-TPPA campaigner, Dr Sandra Grey, addressed a gathering of  citizens, in Midland Park, in Wellington’s CBD;

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Dr Grey told the crowd of  nearly one thousand, that the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement  (TPPA) had not yet been signed, and was not due for ratification until early next year.

She encouraged those listening to let other people know that this was by no means a done deal and they should let others know. Dr Grey encouraged people to “flood the internet” and spread the word to lobby National not to ratify the agreement.

As numbers in the park swelled, people brought their own, home-made signs to make their views known;

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These citizens not only expressed their dissatisfaction with the TPPA and the shady, secretive process surrounding it, but were working to engage young people in the electoral process. They wanted New Zealand’s youth to exercise their vote and thereby choose their own future;

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Some more imaginative signs;

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Banners from the Green Party, Nurses Organisation, and Wellington Social Workers;

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The marchers, setting off from Midland Park;

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By the time the protest march left Midland Park, numbers had increased to between 1,500 to 2,000 people. However, something very unusual became apparent even before the protesters made their way out onto Lambton Quay.

The view south, with March-Marshalls (in yellow vests) on the road;

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The view north, with TV1 reporter and cameraman standing on the center traffic-island;

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No police presence.

There was not one single policeman or woman, nor a patrol car, for crowd or traffic control. Traffic and crowd control were left up to the Marshals – all of whom did a magnificent job.

With traffic stopped, the marchers moved out onto Lambton Quay;

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With the head of the march behind him, TV1’s reporter was filmed by his cameraman for the 6PM News;

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As protesters made their way to Parliament, more people joined the march;

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Winding their way along Lambton Quay, numbers had ballooned to around 2,000;

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Ben held aloft New Zealand’s current flag – in many ways symbolic of the struggle to retain something of this country’s independence.

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The TPPA could rightly be seen as a radical change for  New Zealand; the submerging of our heritage and culture by forces of globalisation.

Perhaps there is a kind of mad logic to our esteemed Dear Leader’s desperate need to spend $26 million on a flag-referendum when the public has shown little appetite for changing our flag.

If the TPPA is a new, corporatised road for this country, then John Key’s desire to have the silver fern (or some incarnation of it) as our new flag suddenly makes sense. A new flag is the ‘re-branding’ of New Zealand, as part and parcel of a TPPA world.

Having a young citizen – Ben – waving an old, traditional symbol of this country, is made more poignant because of his youth. It is not often that young people hold on to aspects of our Past and Present.

Perhaps, in times of rapid change and uncertainty, we try to hold on to elements of the Past, to anchor ourselves in the  Present.

Amongst all the party and union banners and the anti-TPPA signs, Ben’s little Kiwi flag made more sense as a symbol for resistance.

Reaching the Bowen St/Lambton Quay/Whitmore St intersection, there was still a zero police presence. This left March Marshalls with the tricky task of managing traffic flow and permitting protesters pass through safely;

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I mentioned the lack of police presence to a msm journalist and he agreed; he had noticed the same curious thing. He said it made it him feel nervous.

I agreed, I said. But not because there might be trouble-makers amongst the protesters. I pointed out it would only take one lunatic driver to drive his or her car into the crowd, injuring or killing someone.  I recalled a very similar tragic event happening sixteen years ago, during a picket at the Port of Lyttleton.

The march made it’s way past the Cenotaph;

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Usually, at this point, I make my way up onto Parliament’s grounds. This time, I remained at the intersection, my camera ready.

Sure enough, this dark-coloured SUV slowly nosed it’s way amongst the marchers;

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The driver moved through the procession, at one point only a metre from people in front of his bumper. I moved closer to the vehicle,  continuing to  take photographs, to let him know that I was watching and recording. If the driver became belligerent behind the wheel, I would be recording his behaviour before interceding;

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Heading toward the gates of Parliament, another young protester with her home-made sign;

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Granny expresses her appreciation!

Once the march had moved through the intersection, I noticed a white utility vehicle with its amber lights flashing, to hold back traffic. Whether this was a thoughtful citizen using his/her initiative to control traffic – or had been directed to do so by police or Wellington Council – is unknown;

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A minute later, a sole police vehicle drove past – their role in traffic management (if any), too late for any practical purpose. Protestors had moved off the road and traffic was already moving again;

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As protesters made their way onto Parliament’s grassy lawns, we discovered why there had been no attempt by Police at any form of traffic management. They were waiting for protesters on the forecourt, lined up in front of Parliament’s steps, protecting an empty building;

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The first speaker to address the crowd was environmentalist lawyer, working part-time at Victoria University, Tom Bennion;

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Tom voiced his concern that the TPPA could prevent necessary action being taken to address global warming. The TPPA fell short of environmental protections and gave greater prominence to protecting  corporate rights. He said implementing the TPPA would harm our chances for meaningful action on climate change, and demanded that the issue be more fully debated in Parliament.

The second speaker was local Iwi representative and lawyer, Moana Sinclair;

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Moana told the crowd that with thirty thousand pages of TPPA text and other documents to analyse  was a daunting task. She was scathing on the TPPA and it’s implications for Maori, saying that as Maori “we already know about this kind of bullshit”. She said that “we still don’t know what’s in the Treaty-related clauses.

Moana rejected reassurances from National ministers saying “we’re sick and tired of their lies”. Without legal analysis of the 30,000 pages of the TPPA and supporting documents, she was sceptical that there were no hidden ‘fish hooks’ waiting to be discovered.

The following speaker was Jimmy Green, from “Gen Zero”;

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Jimmy said he first became interested in climate change issues at the age of 14. The more he found out, he said, the more convinced he became that “it is an insult to our ancestors that we ruin the world for our children”.

Jimmy specifically condemned the Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) provisions of the TPPA, saying that if investments could be put at risk by governments legislating for social, health, environmental, or education issues, then investors should not have made those investments in the first place.

Jimmy described the TPPA as a castle built on sand and that no government can go against the will of the people and survive. He described the TPPA as “just an idea, and ideas can be undone”. He described New Zealanders as generally good people and that Kiwis had the necessary courage to stand up and walk away. He said people might not fully understand the implications of the TPPA and that it was our role to make them understand.

Jimmy was followed by Peace Action campaigner, Valerie Morse;

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Valerie explained that the TPPA was a vehicle to increase massive concentration  of wealth  to the already rich super-elite. It would benefit the elite ‘haves’ at the expense of the the rest of the world.

Valarie also condemned the TPPA as another means by which New Zealand is increasingly being tied to US and it’s insane war policies. She described the TPPA as part of gangster capitalism. Painting a stark picture of our recent history, Valerie pointed out that New Zealand had been at war for the last fourteen years.

Valerie pointed out there was a massive campaign under way to win the “hearts and minds” of the public to support  the ongoing “War on Terror” in Afghanistan, Iraq, and elsewhere. She described the Army games in Southland  where “mock” protesters  had been beaten up as part of the exercise. Was that what lay in store for ordinary people who chose to protest against their governments, she asked?

“War is not a by-product of US capitalism”, Valerie explained, “it is an integral part of it”. She warned that we should expect New Zealand to become more deeply involved in the US killing campaign;

“If we organise against the TPPA, expect to be labelled a terrorist.”

Valerie’s sobering warnings was followed by poet, Cory Brian;

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Corey read his thought-provoking poem to the crowd, who listened in silence;

My journey begins fresh, anew,
the rush of a city, no longer we west coast few,
day to day select few pray,
for those around them to share their stay

you enjoy that which ancestors build,
your over payed politicians form the Decisions Guild,
to guide a nation as they see fit,culture and heritage not cared for one bit
our farms, our river all sold to market,
and before you find out the hope you’ll kark it,

For if we were ever collectively aware,
then that fat old Decision Guild would have something to fear 
But alas that is just not the case,
you all turn away, afraid to face
the fact that generations to come,
may have difficulty seeing the sun,
not only through our cause of pollution,
but also that we struggle for a simple solution 
to stem the flow that society has made
its ever pushing tide for culture to fade.

Continue on mankind this path 
so it shall read your epitaph:

Man was here but a few hundred years 
molesting the earth without any cares
digging, polluting, No consequences,
mother natures only choice left?
to dismantle mans fences,

individually the choices, signs and roads we take
each day increases whats at stake
what would happen if we thought as one?
could we possibly redirect the gun?
away from our mouths that cause this harm,
towards our futures and fast track calm?

It will not be those that we follow,
but us, the new with minds as swift as the swallows,
we are that our past envisioned
the future to mend is our decision!

But how you ask your eyes to me?
Open your Eyes…. Not just those two,
and you shall see,
the page is blank our chapters to write
now take up your pen and create YOUR sight.

With a pen you say thinking im mad
now wait for it and IL point out whats sad

laws are made with but a pen
yet dictate the actions of nearly all men
your headphones occupy your ears,
so that mother culture can lullaby all your fears
your are bound, constricted, unconsciously gagged,
cameras posted everywhere ensure you remain tagged,
livestock bumbling through these concrete streets…

now compare that to the stupid animals you raise, feed, and eat.

Following Corey, Pala from ‘Real Choice NZ’, was given the microphone;

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Pala told the crowd that people think that democracy goes with capitalism. He shook his head and said, “No, capitalism has always tried to squash democracy“. He said this was especially true for indigenous peoples’ rights.

Pala said that the TPPA will benefit only a few and “is at the forefront  of the wedge to sharpen inequality between people”. He warned that even if the TPPA fails, corporate power  would remain in place, subverting public institutions for private gain, and needed to be constantly fought.

Echoing the sentiments of many other New Zealanders, Pala condemned this government for squandering $26 million on a flag referendum, while insisting there was insufficient money to spend on child poverty. He demanded to know why a referendum could be held to determine our flag, but not on the issue of the TPPA.

Pala ended by reminding us;

” We are in the middle of a serious assault on democracy. Democracy is a living thing, but also a fragile thing as well.”

Pala was followed by long-time anti-TPPA campaigner and Mana Party activist, Ariana;

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Ariana told the crowd that thousands of people across the country were standing up today “for what we believe in”.  She condemned the current government as treasonous, saying,

“We need to get these neo-liberal bastards out of our country. It is a mockery of democracy when this important issue will be decided by only twenty people in Cabinet!”

She said there was only one way to get rid of this government, and that was to get everyone voting in 2017.

Ariana said that the TPPA was not good for New Zealand and certainly not good for small businesses. She wanted to see support for local businesses grow, and not the empowerment of multinational corporations.

Ariana encouraged everyone to put up “TPPA Free Zone” signs, as New Zealanders did in the 1980s, during the nuclear-free campaign. The signs could be downloaded from Facebook and other websites.

As many others have pointed out, Ariana stated that the TPPA was an investor-corporations “bill of rights” and not about free trade.

Citizens listened intently to the speakers;

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The last speakers were also the youngest, Tracy and Katie, who have played their part in the anti-TPPA campaign;

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Introducing Tracey and Katie, Ariana  told the crowd how they forfeited  “Trick or Treating” at the Robbie Williams Concert, and instead worked through the evening handing out TPPA leaflets to the concert-goers.

This elicited a mass-cheer and clapping  from the crowd.

Tracey told the crowd that her annual school speech was on the topic of – the TPPA!

“Kia Ora My name is Tracey… I am 13 years old… Today I am here as I am worried about what will happen to mine and my friends’ future if the TPPA is signed!!!! I have on many times handed out fliers and chalked for people to google TPPA…Many people have seemed interested in what I have had to say whilst handing out leaflets… Though some people have not and have been quite nasty!! Ha ha Mum was always there to give them some facts! This year we had to write a speech for school the topic was “There is a problem in New Zealand and I can solve it by? well you can just guess what I talked about – Yes, the TPP… It was very one-sided as there was nothing from the government because it was a deal being done in secret, but there were plenty of articles about why we shouldn’t sign it from lessons learned overseas … This is my future this government is playing with and I say Don’t SIGN the TPPA.”

Katie spoke passionately on climate-change affecting her future;

“Kia Ora My name is Katie …. I am 12 years old. Today I am here like you because I am worried about what will happen to mine and my friends’ future if the TPPA is signed!!!! I have on numerous occasions handed out fliers and chalked for people to google TPPA… The reason I do this is because I have been to many very interesting discussions where people have passionately spoken about our Country and the TPP, And NO never any good news, if there was, the bad was way worse than the good! … I have been to many TPP rally meetings and rallies… Mum has made sure we are at most of them!… Her point of view is, We will not go to her in a few years time and say, but Mum you guys could have done something to stop it!!! Why didn’t you???? So here we are!! And look at all of you, so I am guessing you all agree with us as you are here too! Thank you for helping stand up for a better NZ for us all… TPPA NO WAY!”

Tracey and Katie are ambassadors for the generations that will inherit our country – indeed our planet. We cannot ignore their voices.

Finally, no protest rally is ever really completely done without at least one excellent artist to perform for the crowd. In this case, Matiu Te Huki belted out two great songs, to everyone’s joy;

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Matiu’s voice did real justice to the songs he sang.

On that ‘note’

Whilst I won’t point out which policeman or woman it was, I spotted one  in the police-line tapping his/her foot, in time to the music. Constables – you’re allowed to enjoy the music. We really, really don’t mind.

The last word, I leave to the maker of this simple – but insightful – message;

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Tomorrow: The TPPA March – Something concerning regarding the Police presence at Parliament on Saturday afternoon.

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References

NZ Herald: Sentence for Lyttleton picket line fatality too light – union

The Daily Blog: Keith Rankin – White Trite

Facebook: TPPA Free Zone and Action plans

Te Papa: Nuclear free sign

Previous related blogposts

Citizen A – 29 Nov 2012 – TPPA Special

TPPA: Business launches propaganda campaign

TPPA: Doomsday scenarios, Critics, and flights of fancy

Open message to the Middle Classes about the threat of the TPPA

Nationwide Rally Against the TPPA – Day of Action!

They marched against the TPPA and the threat to our sovereignty (part tahi)

They marched against the TPPA and the threat to our sovereignty (part rua)

The Mendacities of Mr Key #5: Has Tim Groser shown the P.M. to be a liar on the TPPA?

Nationwide Day of Protest Captures Public Attention on TPPA

Opposing the TPPA – the Heavens hold their deluge ’till the People speak

Citizens face Police armed with tasers at Wellington TPPA protest march

Support groups

Facebook: Oil Free Wellington

Facebook: It’s Our Future – Kiwis concerned about the TPPA

Website:  It’s Our Future

Facebook: Aotearoa is Not for Sale

Action Stations: A Secret Trade Deal So Terrifying That Parliament Isn’t Even Allowed To Know What It Says

Facebook: TPPA Action Group – Wellington

OraTaiao New Zealand Climate and Health Council

Copyright (c) Notice

All images stamped ‘fmacskasy.wordpress.com’ are freely available to be used, with following provisos,

» Use must be for non-commercial purposes.
» Where purpose of use is commercial, a donation to Child Poverty Action Group is requested.
» At all times, images must be used only in context, and not to denigrate individuals or groups.
» Acknowledgement of source is requested.

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tppa - everyone's a winner

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This blogpost was first published on The Daily Blog on 16 November 2015.

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Key’s TPPA Falsehoods – “We’ve never, ever been sued” ***up-date ***

22 October 2015 8 comments

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law_scale

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Previously blogged on 13 October;

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4 October 2015 - TVNZ Q+A @ 13.04 "There has never been a case taken against New Zealand..." @ 16.24 "We've never, ever been sued..."

4 October 2015 – TVNZ Q+A:- @ 13.04 “There has never been a case taken against New Zealand…” @ 16.24 “We’ve never, ever been sued…”

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On 4 October,  our esteemed Dear Leader assured New Zealanders that, under the various free trade agreements we are party to, “there has never been a case taken against New Zealand…” and “we’ve never, ever been sued…”.[…]

Key’s insistence that  New Zealand is safe from lawsuits from foreign corporations indicates  he was privy to the text of the finalised Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement (which is still a closely guarded secret by Trade Minister Groser) and that  we, as a nation, are now fully exposed to litigation from Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) processes.

It seems that Dear Leader spoke too soon.

Not even a fortnight passed since he uttered those fateful words – an apparent challenge to the gods – and New Zealand is now being sued;

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Shanghai Pengxin going to High Court over Lochinver decision - TPPA - investor state dispute settlent

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In response to the lawsuit, our esteemed and much-loved Dear Leader stated;

“Quite frankly, you can get appeals both ways, so when Shanghai Pengxin was granted the right to buy the Crafar farms, there was also an appeal because that went through, and it was tested back in court – now it’s going the other way.

But look, in the end, if the courts determine that the Overseas Investment Office got it wrong, the Government will go and reflect on that and honour the law, we always do that.”

The only difference between scenarios envisaged under the TPPA and the Lochinver Station-Shanghai Pengxin-OIO case is that the latter is being tested under the jurisdiction of a New Zealand Court of law instead of an extra-judicial, and often-secret,  corporate tribunal overseas.

This is cold comfort.

We now have a situation in our own country where, if we determine not to sell to an overseas investor, that decision can be over-turned. Our laws now allow foreign interests to be on an equal footing with New Zealand citizens.

You no longer have to be a tax-paying citizen (born or naturalised) to hold certain rights.

You can be a foreign corporation (or wealthy individual) with deep pockets and a small militia of flinty-eyed lawyers.

Money is now all it takes.

Mark 15 October 2015 in your diary as the day when our sovereignty was forfeit in the pursuit of global finance. If we dare say ‘No’, they have ways of changing our minds.

This will be the first, of many to come, “legal” challenges to our sovereignty.

And the worst aspect to where we have arrived, 31 years after David Lange’s government was elected and Roger Douglas began his so-called free-market “reforms”?

As a nation, Kiwis have allowed it to happen. We did this to ourselves.

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References

TV1 Q+A: PM on TPP – ‘We’ve never ever been sued’

Fairfax media: Shanghai Pengxin going to High Court over Lochinver decision

Additional

MFAT: New Zealand-China Free Trade Agreement

New Zealand China Free Trade Agreement (text)

Government could have faced lawsuit

Previous related blogposts

Al Capone lives again?

Three Questions to Key, Williamson, Coleman, et al

Another of John Key’s lies – sorry – “Dynamic Situations”

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TPPA-cartoon

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This blogpost was first published on The Daily Blog on 17 October 2015.

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Letter to the editor – John Key; “We’ve never been sued” (up till now)

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Frank Macskasy - letters to the editor - Frankly Speaking

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from: Frank Macskasy <fmacskasy@gmail.com>
to: Sunday Star Times <letters@star-times.co.nz>
date: Fri, Oct 16, 2015
subject: Letter to the editor

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The Editor
Sunday Star Times
.On   4 October 2015, on  TVNZ’s Q+A, our esteemed Prime Minister reassured New Zealanders that we had nothing to fear from the newly signed TPPA, and it’s controversial provisions for corporations to sue us.

Key insisted,  “There has never been a case taken against New Zealand…” and  “We’ve never, ever been sued…”
Barely a fortnight has passed since he uttered those resolute words on our television screens –  and New Zealand is now being sued.

Chinese corporation Shanghai Pengxin – the same company that bought the 17 Crafar Farms last year – was recently denied permission to purchase the vast 14,000 hectare Lochinvar Station.

Even the current National government believed that was a step too far.

John Key’s words that “There has never been a case taken against New Zealand…” and  “We’ve never, ever been sued” now ring hollow in our ears.

The first (of many) lawsuit by a foreign corporation has begun. With it, the beginning of the end of our sovereignty, as overseas interests now force their way further into our country, and economy, irrespective of our wishes.

And the TPPA’s provisions to allow further lawsuits by corporations has not even been implemented yet.

-Frank Macskasy

 

[address and phone number supplied]

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References

TV1 Q+A: PM on TPP – ‘We’ve never ever been sued’

Fairfax media: Shanghai Pengxin going to High Court over Lochinver decision

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try the carrot again

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The Mendacities of Mr Key # 14: The TPPA – “We’ve never, ever been sued”

18 October 2015 1 comment

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tpp-banner

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On 4 October,  our esteemed Dear Leader assured New Zealanders that, under the various free trade agreements we are party to, “there has never been a case taken against New Zealand…” and “we’ve never, ever been sued…”.

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4 October 2015 - TVNZ Q+A @ 13.04 "There has never been a case taken against New Zealand..." @ 16.24 "We've never, ever been sued..."

4 October 2015 – TVNZ Q+A:-

@ 13.04

              “There has never been a case taken against New Zealand…”

@ 16.24

              “We’ve never, ever been sued…”

 

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Key’s “assurances”   were made four days prior to MFAT (Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade) releasing “Fact Sheets” outlining New Zealand’s exposure to lawsuits from corporations. Two MFAT documents – Investment and ISDS and  Market Access for Services and Investment are dated by a Scoop Media press-release  which places their release at 8 October.

Key’s insistence that  New Zealand is safe from lawsuits from foreign corporations indicates  he was privy to the text of the finalised Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement (which is still a closely guarded secret by Trade Minister Groser) and that  we, as a nation, are now fully exposed to litigation from Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) processes.

Despite Key’s insistance that “there has never been a case taken against New Zealand…” and “we’ve never, ever been sued…”, one only has to look across the Tasman to understand the full ramifications of ISDS provisions in trade agreements.

As Corin Dann reminded Key during the 4 October Q+A interview;

@13.07

“…If we look at the plain packaging [proposed legislation for tobacco] in Australia, you’ve always said, ‘Australia’s being sued over that issue of plain packaging … in that that Investor-State Forum’; you’ve always said ‘we’ll wait for Australia to see how they go, ‘cos they’re going cop a massive legal bill’, so that’s stopped that [proposed legislation for tobacco] happening in New Zealand.”

Indeed, Dann was spot on.

A little under two years ago we  had our own Smoke-free Environments (Tobacco Plain Packaging) Amendment Bill, introduced by then co-leader of the Maori Party, Tariana Turia, on 17 December 2013.

With  15,682 submissions received  from interested groups and individuals, on 5 August 2014 the Health Committee recommended;

The Health Committee has examined the Smoke-free Environments (TobaccoPlainPackaging) Amendment Bill and recommends that it be passed with the amendments shown.

Despite cross-party support (with the curious exception of NZ First, for reasons that defy understanding), the Bill was put on “hold” by National.

This is what Key had to say about why  the Bill was put  “on hold”, until a court case between the Australian government and tobacco giant,  Philip Morris, is settled in an Australian court. He said,

“I don’t really see the point in us finally passing the legislation until we see exactly what happens in the Australian court case. We have a slightly different system, but there might just be some learnings and if there are learnings out of that, it would be sensible to potentially incorporate those in either our legislation or avoid some significant costs.”

Two points to consider:

  1. Remember that this is an industry that kills up to 4,600 people each year. If it were a bacterial or viral disease, the entire nation would be in a State of Emergency, and entire communities, towns, and cities quarantined.
  2. Is “learnings” an actual word?

John Key insists that New Zealand has never been sued under any free trade agreement.

Strictly speaking, that is correct.

However, we have already seen how even the possible hint of a lawsuit is sufficient to stay his hand and prevent the passing of a law that could potentially have  saved  up to 5,000 lives a year and saved the health system up to $1.6 billion per annum (est.).

In which case, the ISDS clause of the TPPA may never be tested under a National government – they would simply shy away from any legislation or other governmental policy provoking the merest suggestion of legal action. No matter how beneficial  a policy might be.

In an interview onThe Nation’, on 10 October, Trade Minister Tim Groser already seemed resigned to the fact that New Zealand could be sued if a government went ahead to introduce plain packaging for sugar-laden ‘fizzy’ drinks;

Lisa Owen: You could force plain packaging for fizzy drinks, say?

Tim Groser: I believe you probably could as long as you had a good health-based case and you’re ready to defend it.

Key’s timidity has already been shown with crystal clarity; we’ve never been sued before simply because National hasn’t the guts to be challenged.

Get some guts, Dear Leader!

Addendum1

During the 4 October Q+A interview, Key insisted that Phillips Morris initiated the lawsuit  under Australia’s Bilateral Investment Treaty with Hong Kong instead of the Australia-US FTA because the threshold for proving a case under the US trade agreement was “too high”. Key said,

@ 13.25

“Well interesting enough, Australia has a free trade agreement with, ah, the United States. And in fact, um, they looked, I think, Phillip Morris, or whoever’s taking the case, at taking it under Investor State [Disputes Settlement] and they recognised, that Investor State, the threshold was so high, they’re actually not taking it under the US-Australia FTA. It defeats the very case that Jane Kelsey’s been making. They’re taking it out of a very strange agreement they’ve got with Hong Kong, which is why actually they went and registered themselves with Hong Kong to take the action against Australia.”

So Key is suggesting that Philip Morris chose to use an Australia-Hong Kong FTA rather than an Australia-US FTA because “the threshold was so high”?!

John Key is deflecting.

He is either woefully ignorant, or willfully disingenuous, of the fact that the United States has been the main instigator of Investor State Disputes claims, as UN stats show;

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UNCTAD - ISDS claims - Most frequent home States (total as of end 2014)

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Even if tobacco company Philip Morris chose to employ a Hong Kong-Australia FTA to sue the Australian government, the fact seems immaterial at best.

As UN data shows, US-based investors are not at all reticent in using ISDS provisions to launch lawsuits against sovereign governments.

We have just entered into a trade agreement with the most litigious nation on Earth.

Addendum2

According to UNCTAD report Recent Trends in IIAs and ISDS;

By the end of 2014, the overall number of concluded cases reached 356 out of 608 claims;

Of  these, approximately;

  • 37%  (132 cases) were decided in favour of the State (all claims dismissed either on jurisdictional grounds or on the merits),

  • 25% (87 cases) ended in favour of the investor (monetary compensation awarded).

  • 28% of cases (101) were settled

  • 8% of claims were discontinued for reasons other than settlement (or for unknown reasons).

  • 2%  (seven cases), a treaty breach was found but no monetary compensation was awarded to the investor.

The number of cases (608) has ‘exploded’ since 1987;

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UNCTAD - ISDS claims - Known ISDS cases, annual and cumulative (1987–2014)

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The same UNCTAD report reveals who is being sued by corporations;

In 2014, 60 per cent of all cases were brought against developing and transition economies, and the remaining 40 per cent against developed  countries.

In total, 32 countries faced new claims last year. The most frequent respondent in 2014 was Spain (five cases), followed by Costa Rica, the Czech Republic, India, Romania, Ukraine and the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela (two cases each). Three countries – Italy, Mozambique and Sudan – faced their first (known) ISDS claims in history.

Addendum3

The Economist reported;

Multinationals have exploited woolly definitions of expropriation to claim compensation for changes in government policy that happen to have harmed their business. Following the Fukushima disaster in Japan in 2011, for instance, the German government decided to shut down its nuclear power industry. Soon after, Vattenfall, a Swedish utility that operates two nuclear plants in Germany, demanded compensation of €3.7 billion ($4.7 billion), under the ISDS clause of a treaty on energy investments.

This claim is still in arbitration. And it is just one of a growing number of such cases. In 2012 a record 59 were started; last year 56 were. The highest award so far is some $2.3 billion to Occidental, an oil company, against the government of Ecuador, over its (apparently lawful) termination of an oil-concession contract.

The Huffington Post reported;

Canada is the most-sued country under the North American Free Trade Agreement and a majority of the disputes involve investors challenging the country’s environmental laws, according to a new study.

[…]

About 63 per cent of the claims against Canada involved challenges to environmental protection or resource management programs that allegedly interfere with the profits of foreign investors.

The government has lost some of these environmental challenges and has been forced to overturn legislation protecting the environment.

In 1997, the Ethyl Corporation, a U.S. chemical company, used chapter 11 to challenge a Canadian ban on the import of MMT, a gasoline additive that is a suspected neurotoxin and which automakers have said interferes with cars’ diagnostic systems. The company won damages of $15 million and the government was forced to remove the policy.

A year later, U.S.-based S.D. Myers challenged Canada’s temporary ban on the export of toxic PCP waste, which was applied equally to all companies. Canada argued it was obliged to dispose of the waste within its own borders under another international treaty. However, the tribunal ruled the ban was discriminatory and violated NAFTA’s standards for fair treatment.

The Age reported;

Egypt raised its minimum wage at the beginning of last year [2014]. It wasn’t much by Australian standards, just $74 a month, but for a state employee on 700 Egyptian pounds a month ($102), a rise to 1200 pounds is not to be derided.

A French multinational with operations in Egypt, however, did not like this minimum-wage effrontery. A couple of months later, Veolia, the global services juggernaut, bobbed along and sued Egypt for the grievous disadvantage it had suffered thanks to the industrial relations changes.

Veolia’s claim relies on ISDS provisions in a trade treaty between Egypt and France.

Addendum4

The Philip Morris lawsuit is expected to cost Australian taxpayers $50 million to defend, and proceedings will be held in Singapore, before a secret tribunal.

Addendum5

Two MFAT “fact sheets” – Investment and ISDS and  Market Access for Services and Investment – offer a government view of the TPP Agreement. The actual text of the TPPA will not be released for several weeks, giving National Ministers a monopolistic opportunity to push the government position, unchallenged.

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References

TV1 Q+A: PM on TPP – ‘We’ve never ever been sued’

Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade: Trans Pacific Partnership – Investment and ISDS

Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade: Trans Pacific Partnership – Market Access for Services and Investment

Legislation.govt.nz: Smoke-free Environments (Tobacco Plain Packaging) Amendment Bill

TV3 The Nation: Interview – Trade Minister Tim Groser (transcript)

Daily Mail Online: Cigarette giant Philip Morris sues Australian government for billions over plain packaging law

Parliament: Health Committee Report – Smoke-free Environments (Tobacco Plain Packaging) Amendment Bill – 5 August 2014

Ministry of Health: Excise on Tobacco: Proposed Changes

McCabe Centre for Law and Cancer: Philip Morris Asia Challenge under Australia – Hong Kong Bilateral Investment Treaty

UN Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD): Recent Trends in IIAs and ISDS (pg6)

Yahoo-Channel 7 News: Tobacco giant sues Australia

Sydney Morning Herald: Australia faces $50m legal bill in cigarette plain packaging fight with Philip Morris

The Age: Trade deals acronym really translates to ‘we lose’

Additional

Radio NZ – Focus on Politics: A closer look at the TPP

Radio NZ – Focus on Politics for 14 February 2014

Radio NZ: Plain packaging bill passes first hurdle

NZ Herald:  Most MPs set to back plain-package smokes

Smokefree Coalition: The health effects of smoking

The Economist: The arbitration game

Huffington Post: NAFTA’s Chapter 11 Makes Canada Most-Sued Country Under Free Trade Tribunals

Previous related blogposts

Some thoughts on the Plain Packaging Bill

Public opposition grows against TPPA – Wellington

Public opposition grows against TPPA – Wellington

Annette King on the TPPA

Even Tim Groser was in the dark?!

Joyce, TPPA, and wine exports

The Mendacities of Mr Key # 13: Kiwisaver – another broken promise

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TPP-burger and dead rat

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This blogpost was first published on The Daily Blog on 13 October 2015.

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TPPA – media reports and blogposts

12 October 2015 2 comments

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TPP_map-660x330

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On Tuesday 6 October, the announcement was made that  TPPA negotiations had been completed and signed by the twelve participating nations. The following Radio NZ interviews, as well as other media reports and blogposts, present a wide-ranging picture of this event…

Radio NZ – Morning Report

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Trans-Pacific Partnership signed in Atlanta - radio nz

Trans-Pacific Partnership signed in Atlanta

The Trans-Pacific Partnership deal has been reached in the early hours of this morning in Atlanta. (alt. link)

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Special trade envoy says TPP dairy deal was always going to be tough - radio nz

New Zealand’s special agricultural trade envoy Mike Petersen returned from Atlanta early this week, but has been kept up to date on the latest developments. (alt. link)

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Some key facts about the TPP deal - radio nz

The deal once ratified by the twelve countries will be phased in with some parts not coming into full effect for as long as 25 years. (alt. link)

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Former US trade representative reacts to TPP announcement - radio nz

Former US trade representative reacts to TPP announcement. And as we’ve been reporting this morning the Trans-Pacific Partnership deal has been reached in the early hours in Atlanta. (alt. link)

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Labour's reaction to overnight TPP deal announcement - radio nz

Listening to that is Annette King — the Labour Party’s acting leader.(alt. link)

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International trade policy expert on overnight TPP deal - radio nz

Joseph Stiglitz on the Trans-Pacific Partnership deal,  reached in the early hours in Atlanta. (alt. link)

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More analysis on the TPP deal with our economics correspondent - radio nz

With us again is our economics correspondent Patrick O’Meara. (alt. link)

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Fonterra's chairman John Wilson on TPP deal - radio nz

Fonterra’s chairman John Wilson says the TPP outcome for dairy is far from perfect but he appreciates the effort made by the trade minister Tim Groser and his negotiators and some progress in market access has been made. (alt. link)

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Radio NZ – Nine to Noon

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The trade pact TPP - what will it mean for NZ - radio nz

“It’s been called the most sweeping trade pact in a generation, and will affect 40 percent of the world economy. The Trans-Pacific Partnership was finally signed overnight in Atlanta. It will cut trade barriers and set common standards for 12 countries. But the devil remains in the detail … and the written details have yet to be released. Crawford Falconer is a professorial chair in Global Value Chains and Trade at Lincoln University and a former trade negotiator with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade.” (alt. link)

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Business commentator Rod Oram - radio nz

Business commentator Rod Oram;

The TPPA, the Government’s new science investment strategy and banking arrangements. (alt. link)

 

 

 

 

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Jane Kelsey, Scoop media

National government betrays NZers in TPPA deal

Tuesday, 6 October 2015, 12:16 pm
Press Release: Jane Kelsey

‘This deal is a travesty of democracy’, said Professor Jane Kelsey about the conclusion of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA) in Atlanta, USA.

‘The government has ignored, insulted and lied to its citizens.’

‘Minister Groser has misled New Zealanders. He always knew he was on a hiding to nothing on dairy. I have predicted many times that he would not do as he said and walk away from a lousy deal, but would make claim that there were some intangible future gains from being in the club. That’s exactly what’s happened’. (read more)

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TVNZ  News

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TPP deal agreed, but not an ‘ideal result’ for NZ key exports

7.03am

The Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) has been sealed in the US overnight with New Zealand agreeing to terms with 11 other countries.

Trade Minister Tim Groser told TVNZ’s Breakfast this morning it hasn’t been an “ideal result” for New Zealand’s key exports.

However, TPP opponent Professor Jane Kelsey said “government has ignored, insulted and lied to its citizens” and that “this deal is a travesty of democracy”.

Access for our dairy products to key markets Canada and Japan have not been as fulsome as first hoped, with several countries refusing to remove all blocks to free trade for New Zealand’s beef and dairy exports. (read more)

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‘This deal is a travesty of democracy’ – reaction to TPP agreement

1.27pm

The controversial Trans-Pacific Partnership was sealed in the US overnight, with New Zealand agreeing to terms with 11 other countries including the US and Japan. 

Here is some of the reaction: (read more)

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Fairfax media

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Ministry breaks down TPPA tariff gains; dairy, meat the biggest winners

Countries negotiating the Trans-Pacific Partnership may have finally come to an agreement but the dominant source of support for the New Zealand dollar is still the United States interest rate debate. 

New Zealand and 11 other Pacific Rim countries, including the United States, Japan and Canada, reached a deal on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) after the anticipated announcement on Monday was dragged out due to a sticking point regarding access to international markets for New Zealand dairy.

The Kiwi was trading at US64.64 cents on Monday afternoon, lifting to US65.09c on Tuesday morning. (read more)

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Labour to carry on regardless of TPPA – Ardern

Benn Bathgate
Last updated 15:42, October 6 2015

A Labour Government will make laws without regard to the controversial Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement and if necessary “face the consequences”.

That was the view of Jacinda Ardern, Labour MP and spokesperson for small business, speaking at a Chamber of Commerce event in Rotorua on Tuesday.

“When we’re in Government we’ll continue to legislate as we would and we’ll face the consequences,” she said. (read more)

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Canty manufacturer excited about TPPA

Alan Wood
Last updated 15:43, October 6 2015

Christchurch Metal foundry AW Fraser expects to be one of many manufacturers to benefit from the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA).

Canterbury manufacturers say the needs of the dairy sector have dominated too much when it comes to the pluses and minuses of reaching the trade deal.

Members of the New Zealand Manufacturers and Exporters Association (NZMEA) say that dairy only represents 20 per cent of the country’s exports. (read more)

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Tv3 News

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TPPA countries reach deal

Tuesday 6 Oct 2015 5:20 a.m.

New Zealand’s failed to get all trade barriers for its beef and dairy exports lifted as part of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA).

After several days of intense negotiations in the US city of Atlanta, trade ministers from the 12 countries involved in the TPPA announced they had reached agreement on the world’s largest free trade pact early today (NZ time).

One of the major sticking points in the negotiations was securing greater access for New Zealand dairy products to a number of protected markets. (read more)

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TPPA response swift, varying

By Aziz Al-Sa’afin and 3 News online staff
Tuesday 6 Oct 2015 10:09 a.m.

An urgent law change proposed by New Zealand First would mean international treaties need to be approved by Parliament before they are signed.

The policy comes after the massive and controversial Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA) was agreed to by New Zealand and 11 other Pacific countries today.

Reaction to the TPPA has ranged from descriptions of it being a “betrayal” and “disappointing” to hugely congratulatory.  (read more)

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TPPA: What you need to know

By 3 News online staff

After years of tough negotiations, New Zealand and 11 other Pacific Rim countries have agreed to the massive Trans-Pacific Partnership deal, but what does it mean?

The deal was agreed to early this morning (NZ time) and gets rid of 93 percent of tariffs on New Zealand exports, but Prime Minister John Key admits not eliminating tariffs on dairy was “disappointing”.

The deal is expected to be worth $2.7 billion a year by 2030. (read more)

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TPP agreement boosts NZ shares

Tuesday 6 Oct 2015 6:25 p.m.

New Zealand shares have gained after agreement was reached on the Trans Pacific Partnership deal.

The S&P/NZX 50 Index rose 37.57 points, or 0.7 percent, to 5668.11 today. Within the index, 30 stocks rose and 11 fell. Turnover was $113 million.

Overnight 12 Pacific Rim nations including New Zealand reached a deal on the controversial TTP, which covers 40 percent of the global economy. (read more)

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NZ Herald

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Fran O’Sullivan: TPP deal – Tim Groser puts foie gras on dead rats

Tim Groser’s brinksmanship in the final brutal hours of the marathon Trans Pacific Partnership negotiations secured New Zealand a deal on dairy.

The Trade Minister had to swallow a “few dead rats”. But there’s still plenty of what Groser earlier termed “foie gras” to make for an tasty trade package estimated to be worth $2.7 billion a year for NZ by 2030.

Groser has not secured a gold-plated outcome – as far as NZ’s prime export is concerned – but considerable gains have been made through controlled market access for dairy to major consumer markets like the US, Japan, Mexico and Canada. (read more)

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TPP deal: Now 90 days for scrutiny

Now the Trans Pacific Partnership talks have concluded, New Zealand and the 11 other countries must tick several boxes before the agreement can be brought into force.

Under a rule set by the United States, any agreement cannot be signed until 90 days after negotiations end, to allow time for full consideration of its pros and cons. The same rule also says the agreement’s full text must be made available to the public after 30 days.

In New Zealand, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs will provide a report to the Cabinet on the costs and benefits. The Cabinet will then decide whether to approve the agreement. (read more)

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TPP deal ‘failed to deliver for NZ’ – Labour

The Labour Party says the Trans Pacific Partnership appears to have failed to deliver for New Zealand with few gains for dairy farmers and potential implications for medicines.

Deputy leader Annette King would not say this morning whether the party would back the deal because details about its contents were “scant”.

“[Trade Minister] Tim Groser did say that there would be some ugly compromises,” she said. “We would now like to see what those ugly compromises were.” (read more)

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TPP deal: New Zealand and 11 other countries strike Pacific trade pact

Audrey Young & Jamie Gray,

• TPP deal struck after final, brutal hours of negotiations
• Hailed as the biggest deal of a generation
• Has power to affect 40 per cent of world’s economy
• NZ dairy sector is disappointed
• Tariffs on 93 per cent of NZ exports to new free trade to be eventually eliminated
• But no change to the 20-year patent period for pharmaceuticals

After years of talks, the controversial and secretive Trans Pacific Partnership trade deal has been finalised. (read more)

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Dr Pat Neuwelt: Doctors not prepared to swallow TPP pill

11:20 AM Tuesday Oct 6, 2015

Now that the Ministerial Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA) meetings in Atlanta are completed New Zealanders are one step closer to being locked into a comprehensive new set of rules.

At this stage we still don’t know the details of what Minister Groser’s self-confessed “ugly compromises” are, but we know enough to be certain the agreement has us on the road to stagnation in health and to drive up the cost of medicines. The only question is, by how much?.

It is difficult, at this point, to trust that the government has fully assessed the pros and cons of the deal for New Zealanders now and in the future. (read more)

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Charles Finny: TPP quite different, isn’t it?

1:55 PM Tuesday Oct 6, 2015

I was interviewed on Morning Report by Kim Hill on the TPP outcome. I answered every question as accurately as I could based on the facts that had been made public on the negotiating outcome.

Clearly there were a few inconvenient truths there as I was attacked pretty solidly and pretty viciously by a number of people from around the world on social media.

This should not have surprised anyone. (read more)

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‘What do I do now?’ – Tim Groser

After the completion of exhaustive TPP talks in Atlanta, Trade Minister Tim Groser sounded anything but elated as he talked down the phone at 3 am.

“I feel like I used to feel after university exams,” he said with a certain battle-weariness.

“I would be studying 20-hour days and I would be thinking ‘I cannot wait for the exams to finish’ and then when they finished I would feel slightly ‘well, what do I do now?'”  (read more)

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The Dim Post

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First thoughts on the TPPA

October 6, 2015 6:46 am

I am a little staggered that they actually made a deal. The Herald article on the deal is here:

  • ‘Mr Groser is very upbeat about the overall result, which will be published later today, but less so on dairy.’
  • Access for dairy was literally Groser’s one job when negotiating this deal and he has, characteristically, failed to do it. I’m not that worried though. We’re already well over the environmental capacity for dairying. It’s probably costing more in long-term environmental costs than its earning in export revenue. So the last thing we needed was a trade deal incentivising more dairy. Best case scenario is that this new deal encourages exporters to move up the value chain and make high quality high wage products instead of shipping raw logs and milk powder.
  • ‘There will be no change on the current patents for biologic medicines, although an extension on copyright by 20 years will be phased in.’ (read more)

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The Standard

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TPPA agreement reached

Written By: mickysavage, 7:28 am, October 6th 2015

The deal has been done. We are told that it is the best thing since sliced bread although we are not allowed to know the details.

Tobacco companies will not be allowed to use the investor state resolution procedure which is a good thing. All other industries will however which is very bad. Stand by for the lawyering to start.

Dairy will have a minuscule increase in the amount it can export. Milk powder access will be phased in over 25 years. Fran O’Sullivan describes Groser’s analysis of the deal as putting fois gras on a number of dead rats. (read more)

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As expected, TPPA gives a peanut return

Witten by: lprent,  9:15 am, October 6th 2015

In 15 to 25 years, the expected tariff reduction return to NZ will be (summarized by kiwiblog)

The Beehive site has some details on the deal. The savings on tariffs, once full implemented by sector are:

  • Dairy $102 million
  • Meat $72 million
  • Fruit and vegetables $26 million
  • Other agriculture $18 million
  • Wine $10 million
  • Manufacturing $10 million
  • Forestry $9 million
  • Fish $8 million
  • Wool $4 million

Somewhere around $260 million per year in possible benefits long after I have retired. The upbeat guesstimates by the beehive propaganda sheet say

“The full benefit of TPP is estimated to be at least $2.7 billion a year extra in New Zealand’s GDP by 2030.” (read more)

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No Right Turn

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Just a bit shit really

So, the biggest trade deal in a generation has been finalised. The thing National was pinning all of its hopes of economic success on, John Key’s “something special”. And it turns out to be just a bit shit really, because it doesn’t include dairy. New Zealand’s primary industry, the whole reason why we engage in these talks, and absent some reduced tariffs on cheese in twenty years or so, its excluded. Slow clap, Mr Groser. Heckuva job you’ve done there. You’ve totally earned that knighthood you were gunning for, you royalist suckup. (read more)

MPs are listening on open diplomacy

One area of huge public disquiet around the TPP negotiations is secrecy: everything about them is secret, and a precondition of negotiations was accepting a “confidentiality” agreement forbidding the release of negotiating material for five years after any deal is agreed. The net result is that “our” government has been telling its negotiating partners things without telling us, enabling them to lie to us about what they are negotiating away. And they were explicitly caught doing so on the issue of the investment-state dispute settlement clause. (read more)

 

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Public Address

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TPP, eh?

by Rob Salmond, 11:05 Oct 6, 2015

As everybody knows, the TPPA deal is settled, and we can expect a full text to scrutinise within a month.

The deal really is a very big one globally; it’s just not such a big deal for New Zealand.

It looks to me like the biggest loser in the deal is Mexico. It doesn’t get much in the way of market access that it didn’t already have via NAFTA, and the US-Japan deal on autos hurts a lot of Mexican factories purpose-built to supply auto parts from Japanese car companies into the US. (read more)

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Pundit

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TPP can help lift incomes in New Zealand but to make a difference for people, there’s a lot more work still to do.

The TPP was never going to be the miracle that shot New Zealand to the top of the global supply chain. Neither was it ever going to be the Darth Vadar of deals where American corporations got to destroy the planet. 

It was always going to be a little bit disappointing to everyone. The deal calls for Vietnam to allow free unions and Malaysia to stop people smugglers, but in most countries there aren’t enough gains for politicians to campaign on it. Stephen Harper doesn’t want the text made public until after the Canadian election and Hilary Clinton’s team just want the damn thing off the agenda by 2016. (read more)

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The Daily Blog

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How bad is the TPPA? Read this now!

By Martyn Bradbury, October 6, 2015 

We have been conned into agreeing to this madness. This is a geopolitical war it isn’t a bloody trade agreement and our media have utterly ignored this dimension to the TPPA.

This isn’t a gold standard deal, it’s a gold plated deal. Groser and Key have come back after selling our cow at the free market with 3 magic TPPA beans.

The winners here are corporations and the people have lost. (read more)

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Gordon Campbell

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On the TPP deal reached in Atlanta

October 6th, 2015 If the TPP was the Rugby World Cup, the New Zealand team probably wouldn’t be making it out of pool play. While the final details will not emerge for a month, the TPP is offering disappointing returns for New Zealand… and over a very long phase-in period… of up to 25 years in major areas important to us, even though many of the concessions we have made would take immediate effect. Typically, Prime Minister John Key has already been spinning the “93% tariff free” outcome across the TPP region, as if that situation was entirely due to the TPP deal. To get that figure, Key is adding all pre-existing tariff reductions and adding them to the TPP. To take a relevant example… 80% of US trade with other TPP members is already duty free. (read more)

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TPPA jack of all spades - cartoon

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This blogpost was first published on The Daily Blog on 7 October 2015.

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Categories: Media, The Body Politic Tags: ,

Letter to the editor – Joyce, TPPA, and wine exports

11 October 2015 9 comments

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Frank Macskasy - letters to the editor - Frankly Speaking

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from: Frank Macskasy <fmacskasy@gmail.com>
to: Listener <letters@listener.co.nz>
date: Thu, Oct 8, 2015
subject: Letter to the editor

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The editor
The Listener

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As National ministers go all-out to extol the virtues of the TPPA (whilst studiously looking the other way and ignoring any nasty surprise fish-hooks), Economic Development Minister Steven Joyce added his five cents worth.

On 6 October, speaking on TV3, Joyce gushed like a school boy on a class outing;

“The meat industry, the fruit industry, the wine industry, the forestry industry, the manufacturing industry – all of these get the benefits.”

The wine industry?

According to Peter Howland’s book, “Social, Cultural and Economic Impacts of Wine in New Zealand”, more than 80% of this country’s wine production is now foreign-owned.

Which means that up to 80% of profits could flow back to off-shore investors and end up in overseas bank accounts.

How does that benefit New Zealand?

What was the purpose of the TPPA – to maximise profits for foreign investors? Is that our role now?

I am reminded of something that our esteemed Prime Minister said about foreign ownership of our land-based production;

“I’d hate to see New Zealanders as tenants in their own country…”

Meanwhile, as foreign owners of our wine industry benefit, it is only a matter of time before the price of pharmaceuticals begin to rise in New Zealand.

Key has promised that the cost of medicines subsidised by Pharmac will not increase to consumers, but that increased costs will be met by government.

But where does government get its money from? Answer: taxpayers.

So whether as consumers or taxpayers, one way or another, we will end up paying for higher prescription charges.

We should also not forget that in 2012 National increased the cost of Pharmac-subsidised medicines from $3 to $5 – a move which impacted on low-income families and the chronically sick.

The rationale for increasing prescription charges? To offset a rise in other health costs, according to then-Health Minister, Tony Ryall.

Remember also that not all medicines are subsidised by Pharmac. Many New Zealanders are about to get a nasty shock at their local Chemists.

Any bets when the TPPA will increase the cost of our medicines?

And how long before Key flip-flops again on his assurance that the cost of medicines will not rise?

Our esteemed Prime Minister has a long track record of saying one thing, and later doing the complete polar-opposite.

But at least foreign owners of our wine production will be happy. Cheers!

-Frank Macskasy

 

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[address & phone number supplied]

Acknowledgement for info on wine-production ownership: E-clectic

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References

Fairfax media: No increased medicine costs under TPPA

Fairfax media: How the land lies in foreign hands

NZ Herald:  PM warns against Kiwis becoming ‘tenants’

Fairfax media:  Prescription cost to rise to help pay for Budget

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Letter to the editor – Even Tim Groser was in the dark?!

10 October 2015 8 comments

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Frank Macskasy - letters to the editor - Frankly Speaking

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from: Frank Macskasy <fmacskasy@gmail.com>
to: Dominion Post <letters@dompost.co.nz>
date: Wed, Oct 7, 2015
subject: Letter to the editor

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The editor
Dominion Post

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On TV1 News on 7 October, commenting on the recently signed TPPA, Trade Minister Tim Groser admitted;

“It’s going to take time for people to absorb this, there’ll be things in the detail that even I don’t know about, we had a team of 15 people, it wasn’t just done by Tim Groser for heavens sake.”

There are “things in the detail that even Groser doesn’t know about”?

Is he having us on?

So not only was the entire country in the dark about the contents of the TPPA – but it seems that our esteemed Trade Minister signed us up to an agreement where he was not fully cognisant of the details?
What kind of irresponsible government commits an entire country to an agreement where the finer details are not known? Where even the Trade Minister candidly admits his ignorance of “the details”?

So this is National – the Party of supposedly “responsible economic management”.

Anyone for a new flag? Put an ass on it.
Frank Macskasy

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[Address & phone number supplied]

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References

TV1 News: ‘We just rolled over and had our tummy tickled’ – Labour angst at TPP land deal

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Categories: The Body Politic Tags: ,