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Posts Tagged ‘performance pay’

Radio NZ: Politics with Matthew Hooton and Mike Williams – 17 March 2014

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– Politics on Nine To Noon –

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– Monday 17 March 2014 –

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– Kathryn Ryan, with Matthew Hooton & Mike Williams –

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Today on Politics on Nine To Noon,

Winston Peters and the possible make-up of the next government. Moves to link school funding to performance.

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radio-nz-logo-politics-on-nine-to-noon

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Click to Listen: Politics with Matthew Hooton and Mike Williams (23′ 51″ )

  • Winston Peters, NZ First
  • Judith Collins, Orivida,
  • Helen Clark
  • Green Party transport policy
  • Hekia Parata, education policy, school fundsing system

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1 June: End of the Week Bouquets, Brickbats, & Epic Fails

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– End of the Week Bouquets, Brickbats, & Epic Fails –

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Frank Macskasy - blog - Frankly Speaking

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Nikki Kaye (National MP)  & Kevin Hague (Green MP)

For putting aside their political tribalism to work together to draft a Bill that would legalise adoption by gay and lesbian parents.  The two MPs are to be congratulated for setting a fine example of Parliamentarians working on behalf of minority groups.

Ms Kaye also campaigned strongly to stop mining on conservation land on Waiheke Island.  Is she becoming  National’s de-facto conscience on public issues?

Andrew Williams  (NZ First)

Former North Shore Mayor, and current NZ First MP, Andrew Williams,  for taking a decisive step to remind the great New Zealand public about recent history. On the excellent TVNZ7 programme, ‘Backbenchers‘, on 30 May, Andrew Williams held up a simple chart for the viewer to take note of.

See images here

It was damning indictment  of National’s track record.

What with collective amnesia and deliberate lies spread by National Party groupies, many New Zealanders forget that under a Labour-led coalition, this country enjoyed,

  • low unemployment
  • decent wage increases
  • substantial surpluses
  • apprenticeships to train our young people
  • and our sovereign debt paid down

So when National suggests that Labour left the country in poor economic shape in 2008 – they are simply telling lies to mitigate their own poor fiscal management.

And when the public lazily believe that Labour were not good economic managers – oh, what a fickle bunch you are. Collective amnesia – allows politicians to get away with the Murder of History since the Year Dot.

Myles Thomas (Save TVNZ7 organiser)

For campaigning tirelessly on our behalf to save our last remaining bastion (aside from the much-underfunded Radio NZ) of public broadcasting – TVNZ7 – from being canned by the Barbarians who currently govern us.

This  has no doubt been an expensive, time-consuming, stressful campaign, and the  country owes considerable gratitude to this person and his fellow campaigners.

It is people like Myles Thomas who remind us that there is more to our society than what some politicians think we deserve.

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Frank Macskasy - blog - Frankly Speaking

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Dr Jonathan Coleman (National, former Broadcasting Minister)

For mis-stating  viewing figures for TVNZ7 in Aril 2011. Dr Coleman stated that the viewing figures were only 207,000 viewers per week. The real figures were actually 600,000 to 800,000 at the time. Since then, the viewing  audience  has since risen to 1.4 million per month –  around 1 million  viewers per week.

When this was pointed out to Dr Coleman, his response was… interesting,

I can’t remember exactly but at some point we decided it was 200,000 per week. That formula was not correct but at the end of the day that was not central to the argument.”

See:  Coleman admits he got it wrong on TVNZ7

It’s interesting to learn that National ministers do not consider accurate facts to be ” central to the argument “.

Which begs the question;  if Ministers do not make decisions based on facts – just what do they use? Astrological star signs? Tarot cards? Tea leaves?

With this kind of arrogance from our elected representatives, no wonder people look down of politicians as being less trustworthy than used-car salespeople. Politicians bring it on themselves.

John Key (Dear Leader)

For his breath-taking statement dismissing basic human rights for around 10% of our population,

”  My own personal opinion is the issue of gay adoption is not hugely significant issue and it’s not because it doesn’t matter to those couples who might want to adopt children, but the truth is less than 200 non-family adoptions take place in New Zealand at the moment. ”

See:  Gay adoptions not a priority – PM

Mr Key might be correct in that “ less than 200 non-family adoptions take place in New Zealand at the moment ” – but the gay and lesbian population is estimated at 10% – 440,000 men and women.

It beggars belief that a Prime Minister could be so dismissive of promoting equality and basic rights for a minority in our society.  How can human rights “not be  a hugely significant issue  “?!

This is yet another insight into John Key’s personality; a man who knows the cost of everything, but the value of nothing. Who considers money to be more  hugely significant than rights for our fellow New Zealanders.

Shame on you, Mr Key. Would you be so dismissive if your children were discriminated against? We suspect not.

Hekia Parata (National, Education Minister)

For undermining our excellent education system; undervaluing the hard work our teachers put into preparing our children for their adult lives; and undertaking a fictitious “performance pay” system that will never eventuate – and if it does, will be funded on the backs of hundreds of experienced, highly trained, teaching staff who will lose their jobs in this shambolic process.

In case anyone has missed it, National’s  so-called “reforms” in education are little more than a cost-cutting exercise. Just as National has spent the last three and a half years cutting expenditure, state sector workers, and services.

See:  Q+A: Interview with Hekia Parata, Education Minister

See:  Technology back-down still not enough for intermediates

See:  2500 jobs cut, but only $20m saved

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And for the final category, the Epic Fail of the Week,

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See:  Budget 2012 – Investing In Our Future

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A Budget that successfully contained every piece of ambitious and optimistic phrase, cliche,  and word known to politicians since the Ancient Greeks. And like Greeks bearing gifts, this Budget was one to be handled with extreme caution and suspicion.

Because whilst the Budget will be forgotten in a years’ time, the social consequences that remain will be a slow-detonating  bomb we will all feel in decades to come.

It is unbelievable that a government can create a debt of $40 billion –  with so little to show for it.

In the last three and a half years  National has cut taxes; cut state sector workers; and cut social services. Now, National will be borrowing billions more for building new pointless roads, whilst cutting teacher numbers.

So much for National’s earlier promises that no “front line” services would be cut. What does one call teachers, if not at the very coal-face of our social and economic future?

At a time when we should be encouraging more and more young people to stay in education and not drop out in joblessness – John Key, Bill English,  and Hekia Parata are planning to cut teaching numbers?

This blogger can’t make up his mind if those foolish New Zealanders who voted National last year elected short-sighted fools; lunatics; or ideological saboteurs, to govern us.

School’s out on that point.

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Performance Pay? Why not!

25 March 2012 4 comments

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"Well, it's important to our country, and I am the minister of education, and I am committed to raising achievement..."

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Education Minister, Hekia Parata, has indicated that performance pay is back on National’s agenda for teachers in this country,

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Full Story

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In the Fairfax report, Parata states quite candidly,

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Whether it’s promotion, pay, opportunities to attend conferences or representative roles, or whatever – there are a mix of rewards that I think would be reasonably easy to settle on

The precursor to being able to reward monetarily or in leadership opportunities is to have a really reliable evaluation system and one that has real integrity and regard for it.

We’re at the very early stages of developing that kind of system. But that would be essential to be able to get to a point where you could make discriminatory choices.” – Ibid

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However, she was less than candid on TVNZ’s Q+A on 25 March, where she had this exchange with interviewer, Shane Taurima,

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SHANE Let’s go back to teaching quality, because you’ve been quoted this weekend saying that pay performance is back on the table. Is that correct?

MS PARATA Look, I think the first thing that has to be on the table is having a robust and reliable appraisal system that allows us to make those kinds of differentiations. If we want to raise teacher quality, we have to identify who is delivering successful practice and make that common practice. We have to identify where we need to improve the professional learning and development so that teachers can engage with students successfully and our students’ achievement is raised.

SHANE So is that back on the table, pay performance? Is that part of your thinking, I suppose?

MS PARATA Look, I think it’s really important that we don’t think there’s one kind of silver bullet, and I think that the mix of rewards that we might want to have available are second-order to having an appraisal system that we can all rely on. And the point of an appraisal system is not to punish or blame but to identify where the best practice is occurring, how we get that happening across all schools and where improvement needs to occur and how we get support in.

SHANE Former education minister Anne Tolley, she told the NZEI annual meeting last year, and I quote, “I’ve made it very clear that this government has no intention of pursuing performance pay.” Has that changed?

MS PARATA Again, I think we need to focus on what our purpose is, which is raising achievement of all New Zealand students.

SHANE So you’re not absolutely ruling it out?

MS PARATA No, I’m not ruling it out or ruling it in. I’m saying that the purpose of the education system is to send kids out into the world with a qualification that’s meaningful. In order to do that, we need to have quality teaching in the classrooms, all the way from year one through to year 13.”

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Ms Parata seemed somewhat reticent during  the interview to come straight out and let the public know what National’s agenda was on the issue of performance pay for teachers.

It seems fairly clear, from the leaked documents that performance pay for teachers is very much on National’s agenda. I suspect that with so much going wrong recently, the party hierarchy have decided not to make public this little detail just yet. There are too many ‘fish hooks’ in such a policy and the last thing the Nats need right now is yet more industrial action – this time from teachers unwilling to cop any reduction in their wages and conditions. They’ve seen what’s been happening throughout the country, with one industry after another experiencing strikes, lock-outs, and reductions on pay and conditions.

Key, Parata, and others in the  National hierarchy understand full well that if push-comes-to-shove, teachers will strike.

So it’s “softly,softly” at the moment with performance pay.

However…

Shane Taurima then asked a very interesting and very clever question of Ms Parata,

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SHANE You’ve made the commitment to lift the number of 18-year-olds with level 2 NCEA from 68% to 85% over five years. Is that an absolute must-achieve for you or is it an aspiration?

MS PARATA Well, look, it’s both. I mean, I aspire to that, but the fact is our country needs well-qualified young people.

SHANE I suppose my point in asking the question…

MS PARATA I’m committed to achieving 85%. That means we need to collaborate across the sector and indeed the country. We need, outside of schools, for parents to be committed to their children doing well, to have high expectations of them and to go into schools and demand those expectations.

SHANE The point of my question, I suppose, is that if you don’t meet the target, is this when you put your career on the line today and you say, “If I don’t meet the target, this is what happens”?

MS PARATA Look, of course we must have ambitious goals as a government, and I am ambitious for students in the New Zealand education system. We cannot have more of the same. It means we have to do something different. So if…

SHANE So does that mean putting your career on the line and saying, “I will achieve it”?

MS PARATA I don’t think we need to get quite that dramatic.”

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Interesting. Ms Parata plans to put teachers on performance-related pay – but is not prepared to do likewise herself. Parata states that she is committed “to lifting the number of 18-year-olds with level 2 NCEA from 68% to 85% over five years” – but is not willing to put her performance to the test.

Performance-related pay for teachers:  Must Have.

Performance-related pay for politicians: Too dramatic.

Ok, I think we can see how this works.

In this respect, she reminds me of another current Minister, Paula Bennett.

When much younger, and on the DPB, Ms Bennett used the Training Incentive Allowance to fund her way through  University  and to buy a house – and then  immediatly scrapped the TIA when she became Minister.

The odour in the air is called rank hypocrisy.

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