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Life in Lock Down: Day 23

18 April 2020 2 comments

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April 17: Day 23 of living in lock-down…

It’s a gray, cool, overcast Autumn day. Dead leaves are starting to cover my paths and lawns. Pretty much another ordinary Autumn day, like so many through my years, and years to come. Except it’s anything but ordinary as humanity experiences an event that will be a marker for the early part of the 21st Century.

It’s another work day. Same routine; drive past the Park N Ride; two cars. Along the main road to SH2 – and what do I see…?

A few days ago;

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This afternoon;

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One missing motorhome. Obviously the owner didn’t get the memo that it’s not Alert Level 2 just yet. It’ll be interesting to see if it’s back tonight, on my way home.

On the motorway, traffic seems marginally busier  than last week. Of course, it’s a subjective assessment based on observation, memory, and a bit of guesswork. Sighted; police car parked up on the side of the highway; Fulton Hogan roadworks truck; “ZAP” pest control van; “New World” heavy truck; “Toll” heavy truck and a “Toll” medium sized truck; a bin-hire truck with a skip-bin; a “Geeves” scaffolding truck; “Al’s Litta bins” flat deck truck; “Budget” rental light truck; “Precision” glazing van; “Packaging Products” truck; “Ministry of Plumbing” plumbers van; “Morepork” gravel-hauling truck; 2 “L.G. Anderson” container trucks; a gravel-hauling truck towing a small front-end loader; “Low Cost Bins” ute; “Beaurepairs” truck; an empty flat deck hi-ab truck; patient transfer ambulance SUV; “Downer” ute; “Westward” truck hauling various building materials; “Linfox” fuel tanker; “Central Group” forklifts and trucks branded truck; “Laser Plumbing” van; “Canon Hygiene” van; “Countdown” food delivery van; “MGI” van; “TIMG” van; “Allied Security” car; “ATMS” road works truck in Vivian Street, outside of Terrace Tunnel; “Spotless Catering” van; 2 police cars in Vivian Street; 2 “Cory’s” utes; Salvation Army Family Store truck; “ATMS” road works truck in Mt Victoria Tunnel; “Toll” truck in tunnel, “Owens” truck…

Traffic did seem a little heavier than previous weeks. Especially travelling through the Mt Vic tunnel, activity is on the increase, without doubt.

As I drove along Vivian Street headed toward the Eastern Subsurbs, I noticed how overgrown the green park was in front of the School of Architecture and Design building was starting to become. As in most post-apocalypse movies, urban scapes are soon reclaimed by nature’s relentless growth;

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Not quite the scene from the 2007 movie, I Am Legend

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— but given enough time…

This afternoon, more good news mixed with tragedy. New cases are the lowest since mid-March: eight. If this is accurate; if there are no asymptomatic cases floating around the country; and if the downward trend continues, Aotearoa New Zealand will have achieved what no other nation has: eliminating the virus from our borders.

This puts foolish, harping critics like  National’s Paul Goldsmith and ACT’s David Seymour in their proper place; as whining ‘Cassandras’ who are hell-bent on putting this country on a collision course with a virus outbreak along the lines of Italy, Spain, UK, USA, et al.

David Seymour made the astounding  suggestion that Australia was achieving “better results” than Aotearoa;

“Australia appears to be having its cake and eating it too, as it gets achieves better COVID-19 health outcomes than New Zealand with fewer restrictions on economic activity.”

Even the Mediaworks-Newshub article was misleading in its headline;

MPs question New Zealand’s COVID-19 lockdown as Australia’s lighter approach produces similar results

Misleading because it is not true. Australia has five times our population, but seven times our covid19 death toll;

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On 16 April, Australia had 6,447 cases of covid19.  As of 17 April, a day later, the figure had jumped to 6,523.

Australia’s death is also rising. On 16 April it stood at 63. As of today (18 April) covid19 has claimed 65 victims.

Yesterday, as our government was announcing plans to reduce our Alert Level from 4 to 3, Australia was announcing it was extending its lock-down by another four weeks. The UK was extending its lockdown by three weeks whilst Japan had declared a national state of emergency.

Mediaworks-Newshub reported;

National MP Paul Goldsmith is now questioning New Zealand’s approach, pointing out that the two nations have had similar results per capita.

Again, not true. The above infographic shows Australia’s death toll worse than Aotearoa’s. Mr Goldsmith is either ignorant of the facts; being mischievous for National’s political agenda, or is trying to use sheer will-power to magic-up his own version of reality.

Meanwhile, David Seymour continues to tout on behalf of business interests, picking away at lock-down-mandated closure of most retailers;

“It is not clear why a dairy with a one-in one-out policy can open, but other types of retail cannot and that will be damaging and in some cases devastating for those businesses for no clear public health gain.”

He says it’s “not clear”?!

Well, let me make it abundantly clear for Mr Goldsmith and Mr Seymour in simple, easy-to-comprehend terms;

“Germy bad. Make people sick. Germy make people die. Not good. People sad. Put people in ground. Other people cry.”

And here is a pretty crayon picture for Little David and Little Paul;

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There is very good reasoning behind the lock-down. The more people are out, the greater the risk of transmission. Spain, UK, Italy, and New York City have demonstrated with great clarity how transmission of this virus can explode out of control.

More retailers open means more people moving about in retail areas. The more people there are, the closer they get to each other. Social distancing is impossible when limited areas become crowded. (I have witnessed this on fine, sunny days around Oriental Bay when people flock to the wide footpaths to stroll, jog, and ride bikes. Social distancing quickly becomes unrealistic. And some just don’t care.)

Even supermarket’s can become become congested, as I discovered this afternoon (17 April) when shopping for groceries for an immuno-suppressed client.

This was the scene at the Kilbirnie Pak N Save Meats Section this afternoon at 2.30pm. No social distancing whatsoever;

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Worst still, this was the scene in just one aisle at Kilbirnie Pak N Save;

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Any notion of a 2 metre distancing (or even 1 metre!) became utterly unrealistic as clusters of people crowded the aisles. If one person in those aisles was carrying  covid19 and coughed or sneezed, it is likely several dozen shoppers would likely have been infected.

Ironically, there were staff at all entrances to the supermarket “controlling” entry. Yet, the aisles were crowded.

If Mr Goldsmith and Mr Seymour get their way, scenes like above will be repeated throughout the country, in every city, and every popular retailer. We cannot – must not – permit agenda-driven fools like Mr Goldsmith and Mr Seymour to have any influence with the government.

Or people will get sick.

And people will die.

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Current covid19 cases: 1,409

Cases in ICU: 3 (2 critical)

Number of deaths: 11

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References

Mediaworks/Newshub:  MPs question New Zealand’s COVID-19 lockdown as Australia’s lighter approach produces similar results

ABC:  Charting the COVID-19 spread in Australia

Sky News:  Australia in lockdown for another four weeks – PM

RNZ:  UK lockdown extended while Japan declares national emergency

RNZ:  Act Party leader David Seymour gives govt dressing down over retail sector restrictions

RNZ:  Covid-19 – Coronavirus developments in New Zealand on 17 April

Must Read

Democracy Now:  Madrid’s Ice Rink Turned to Morgue as Spain Exceeds China in Coronavirus Deaths

The Independent:  Is Sweden having second thoughts on lockdown?

Elemental: Hold the Line

Other Blogs

Will New Zealand Be Right?

Previous related blogposts

The Warehouse – where everyone gets a virus

Life in Lock Down: Day 1

Life in Lock Down: Day 2

Life in Lock Down: Day 3

Life in Lock Down: Day 4

Life in Lock Down: Day 5

Life in Lock Down: Day 6

Life in Lock Down: Day 7

Life in Lock Down: Day 7 (sanitised version)

Life in Lock Down: Day 8

Life in Lock Down: Day 8 (sanitised version)

Life in Lock Down: Day 9

Life in Lock Down: Day 10

Life in Lock Down: Day 11

Life in Lock Down: Day 12

Life in Lock Down: Day 13

Life in Lock Down: Day 14

Life in Lock Down: Day 15

Life in Lock Down: Day 16 – Bad Friday

Life in Lock Down: Day 17

Life in Lock Down: Day 18

Life in Lock Down: Day 19

Life in Lock Down: Day 20

Life in Lock Down: Day 21

Life in Lock Down: Day 22 – Is that a light at the end of a four week long tunnel?!

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Acknowledgement: Steve Ditko (?)

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This blogpost was also published on The Daily Blog on 18 April 2020.

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Life in Lock Down: Day 5

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March 30: Day five of living in lock-down…

Woke up still in darkness. Alarm hadn’t gone off. Turn to radio clock; it’s a few minutes after 6am… I lie there in the dark, waiting to drift off to sleep… but it ain’t happening. Clock ticks over to 6.55 and RNZ snaps on to the voices of Gyles Beckford, Corin Dann, and Susie Ferguson… Latest updates on covid19; thankfully no one else has died overnight. I waken more and more as the stories unfold…

Medical staff from Canterbury are heading to the West Coast to help after 21 health workers from Greymouth’s hospital had to go into isolation. They had been treating the 70-year-old woman who yesterday became the country’s first Covid-19 fatality.

New Zealand has 514 cases of Covid-19, with one death and 56 recovered. University of Auckland Professor Shaun Hendy speaks to Corin Dann.

The Easter Trading Laws could be amended to let supermarkets stay open on Good Friday and Easter Sunday, days where they are normally forced to stay closed. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern told Susie Ferguson it depends on whether supermarkets need the time shut to restock shelves, but the government will be talking to them directly about the issue.

The Director-General of Health is expecting more cases of community transmission to come to light this week. That’s despite a dip in the number of new cases reported yesterday.

A Wairarapa farmer says heavy rain that fell over the weekend will be a “gamechanger” for the drought-stricken region.

It’s going to be a new day in several ways. Staff/client rosters have been radically changed to reduce the number of clients in our “bubbles”. Mine is still bigger than I would like, but we do the best we can with the tools we have. At least three people are removed from my “bubble”, which makes things marginally safe for them and me.

Quick breakfast with first two coffees of the day; feed the cat; prep home-made lunch (cafes are a luxury from how long ago?); check emails; pack up the gear I need for the day and out the door I go. I’m an hour earlier than I normally am but it’ll give me extra time to take notice of things on my way into Wellington and travelling through the city. This isn’t just a routine drive to work, but also scrutinise how things are progressing in our lock-down world.

First thing I notice, the Park N Ride carpark is virtually empty. An ashphalt field built for several hundred cars now holds just… two;

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Before turning from my suburban road onto SH2 I notice a police car parked on the side of the road. First one for the day?

On the motorway, traffic is again almost non-existent. Perhaps “heavier” by one or two cars. But then, this is supposedly “peak hour” and instead of three of four vehicles in my field of vision, there are six or eight. I don’t think traffic was this sparse since 1920.

Interesting… I’m noticing commercial vehicles on the road which I doubt are “essential”. A heavy truck, painted fiery red, with “Coca Cola” emblazoned over it. Soft drinks? When did that become a staple, essential food?

A few minutes later, a Firewood truck. The vehicle is a light truck and covered. I have no idea if they are delivering firewood or not. If so, and if the driver is coming into contact with clients… [Note, in a weird coincidence, at 10.47pm as I write this, a friend txts me to describe her day in lock-down and mentions having firewood delivered next week. So it seems they are operating in the lock-down.]

Then a C & M Transport heavy-duty truck built for gravel, rock, soil, and similar materials drives down from Horokiwi Rd, onto the motorway. Is that an essential service when the building industry is practically at a stand-still?

At least two trucks lugging shipping containers. I hope those containers are filled with foodstuffs for supermarkets…

Then, a couple of “Rockgas” trucks…

A Chubbs van…

A chemdry van. When did carpet cleaning become “essential”, FFS?!

Is there ANY business that ISN’T open and operating as per normal?!

At the old MoT stop on the Hutt Road a police car pulls over a driver heading in the opposite direction to me…

Wellington is as deserted today as it was last week. Hard to tell if there are more or less cars. At the Basin Reserve roundabout a bicyclist riding her bike on the footpath passes within a metre of a pedestrian. Even in saner times, it looked an unsafe passing manouver.

But driving up the Mt Victoria tunnel showed The Quiet Earth the city had become. At nearly 9am, the tunnel was… empty. I pulled over (yes, illegally… but since I was The Last Man On Earth…) to snap this image;

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Eerie… like something out of an episode of The Twilight Zone, an empty tunnel that seemed to disappear into infinity. It was waiting for me to enter…

Once through the tunnel, a quick drive into the eastern suburbs. More joggers. At 9am, the car park at Miramar New World was full. Queues of well-spaced shoppers waited patiently, in their own two-metre bubbles, respected by others.

At Kilbirnie Pak N Save the carpark seems about half (?) full. I park my vehicle in the underground carpark, which is almost empty. Upstairs, shoppers again queue outside the main doors, with yellow strips conveniently marking two-metre spaces. Everyone is waiting patiently.

At the line I woman remarks how well New Zealanders are doing, considering how we have a “thing” for strong independence and not liking being told what to do. I reply I made a similar point yesterday in something I wrote for a blog. Another of those curious acts of synchronicity that marks our lives.

Inside, there is signage everywhere, imploring people to act responsibly;

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As I make my way through the aisles it takes only a few minutes to realise something: it’s harder to keep two metre spaces from other people than I thought. Most people – two thirds? three quarters? – reciprocate the need to maintain safe distances.

Some don’t. They either don’t understand what two metres is; have forgotten to respect the new boundary; or, simply don’t care.

It’s irritating. In effect, one person standing at, say, the cereal section, commands two metres in radius around her/him. You have to wait till they move on.

Like I said, most respected the new norm. A few didn’t. One guy in particular not only ignored the two metre “bubble” but passed close enough to me to raise strong discomfort in me. And the prick knew. His eyes met mine. He saw the expression on my face.

This carried on  for another two aisles. F**k it, I thought, if he does it again, I’m going to cough in his direction and in a “Dad’s Army” kind-of-voice croak at him,

“Oh, sorry, mate. It’s this coronavirus thing I picked up in China… Can’t seem to shake it…”

But he scurried off to check-out. Inconsiderate prick. I hope his position in Hell is in a very warm spot…

Curiously, the toilet paper section was remarkably well-stocked;

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Has the “Futures Market” for bog paper collapsed?

Not so the baking section. Human locusts had been through the section and left not even a chocolate chip or speck of wholemeal flour,

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At the checkout, more yellow tape marked off two metre intervals. It seemed to be respected by everyone that I saw standing in line;

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Equally important, to safeguard the workers, plexiglass shields had been erected in front of them;

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One checkout operator was heard saying to a customer she wished the shields could stay up permanently.

And just when I thought things couldn’t possibly get any weirder, well they just did.

Two men (?) in full head-to-feet hazmat suits, breathing-masks, and protective goggles appeared at the supermarket entrance. One didn’t want to be photographed – the other did not mind.

Sign of the times;

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Once the groceries have been dropped off, each and every packaged item had to be individually wiped down with a cloth soaked with antiseptic. Fruit and veg – washed. Because there was no way of telling who had handled any of the items and what micro-organisms they had left behind on steel cans, plastic wrappers/bags,  cardboard cartons, and fresh produce.

The future is well and truly upon us.

The drive home at 8pm tonight was quiet. Once I hit the motorway, traffic all but vanished. There were moments when I was literally the only person on the road in either direction.

I phone my partner. It’s now eight days since we’ve laid eyes on each other. We joke that after the next three (four? five?) weeks, we’ll have to get re-acquainted with each other all over again.

Her “bubble” is smaller than mine, but she’s so much safer.

Meanwhile, throughout the day, we heard stories of fools flouting the protocols not to socialise with people outside their “bubble”; of money-hungry businesses whining that they were “essential”; of tourists deciding that self-isolation did not apply to them.

Or politicians like David Seymour and Judith Collins;

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Ok then, let them all open. Every single business. Then, when we have 10,000 deaths, maybe those same politicians will start to think, “Hmmm, maybe this wasn’t such a good idea after all…?”

Some people only take a crisis seriously when the body count goes double or triple digits.

When it comes to the safety and well-being of everyone in the community and when it comes to a few selfish dicks who put their own desires ahead of everyone else, I have zero hesitation in advocating going full throttle law’n’order on their asses. In fact, I have the perfect sentence for those convicted of flouting the stay-home edict: home detention. (Just  make detention double or treble the month long lock-down.) It makes perfect sense when you think about it.

Ironic isn’t it? How the Right are always bleating on about personal responsibility; law and order; and maintaining society.

Except, of course, when business is threatened.

Current covid19 cases: 589

Number of deaths: 1

Number of deaths if Mr Seymour & Ms Collins have their way: hundreds. Possibly thousands.

Sensible people do sensible things. Don’t be Mr Seymour or Ms Collins. Be sensible.

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References

RNZ: Coronavirus – Extra medical staff sent to the West Coast

RNZ: Coronavirus – Looking at the numbers

RNZ: Coronavirus – PM says supermarkets may open over Easter

RNZ: Coronavirus – Dr Ashley Bloomfield expecting more cases

RNZ: Wairarapa farmer labels weekend’s rain a ‘gamechanger’

NZ Herald:  Covid 19 coronavirus – Jenny Craig staff told they are an essential service

Twitter: David Seymour – allow butchers, bakers to open – 30.3.2020

Twitter: Judith Collins – competition for business during a pandemic – 30.3.20

RNZ: Coronavirus – Total number of Covid-19 cases in NZ rises to 589

Must Read

Elemental: Hold the Line

Other Blogs

The Daily Blog: Malcolm Evans – A Letter to the Kids

Previous related blogposts

The Warehouse – where everyone gets a virus

Life in Lock Down: Day 1

Life in Lock Down: Day 2

Life in Lock Down: Day 3

Life in Lock Down: Day 4

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Acknowledgement: Evans

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This blogpost was also published on The Daily Blog on 31 March 2020.

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I spy with my multitude of Eyes

13 September 2018 Leave a comment

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Several pieces of legislation enacted under the previous government saw a vast increase in State surveillance. The GCSB  – first created in 1977 by former National PM, Robert Muldoon, – was initially set up to provide overseas surveillance during the Cold War era.

By May 2013, the powers of the GCSB were extended to permit domestic surveillance of New Zealanders by former National PM, John Key.

A variety of  state “security” and extensions of surveillance powers have been enacted over the past sixteen years;

Labour:

Terrorism Suppression Act 2002

National:

Search and Surveillance Act 2012

Telecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Act 2013

Government Communications Security Bureau Amendment Act 2013

Countering Terrorist Fighters Legislation Bill (aka Customs and Excise Amendment Act 2014)

Not to be outdone, the private sector also dabbles with surveillance. On most occassions, that surveillance is subtle.

In other instances, it is overt and in-your-face.

An example of this is the recently (and currently on-going) re-developement at Kilbirnie  Pak N Save supermarket in Wellington’s Eastern suburb.  The store’s internal up-grade has included the sprouting of dozens of security cameras. In some areas, the high-security of CCTV cameras, descending from the ceiling on poles – eerily like some mutant upside-down mushroom – would be more appropriate for a top secret military installation.

Upon entering the store, the first camera is apparent;

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Foyer at Kilbirnie Pak N Save

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Walking through the turn-styles, into the first part of the super-market – more cameras;

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The Fruit & Vege section;

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Meats…

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Chilled goods, heading toward the Deli and Bakery;

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The Bakery section…

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Down the side of the building (greeting cards, breads, et al)…

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And a close-up of the all-seeing eyes…

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Until  we reach the check-out – and the ubiquitous cameras become a parody of surveillance as their numbers become apparent;

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Frank Macskasy Frankly Speaking blog - The Daily Blog fmacskasy.wordpress.com Kilbirnie Pak N Save - security cameras - cctv - surveillance - nz

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In case the reader has difficulty making out the individual cameras, they are highlighted here;

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Even banks don’t have as many cameras.

In an age of tracking by online corporations like Google and Facebook; by the apps in our smartphones; by CCTVs in buildings, streets, offices, etc – we have reached a surveillance state far surpassing anything envisioned by George Orwell.

Some of us will recall the days of the friendly corner grocer;

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Acknowledgement: Wairarapa Times-Age

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Once upon a time, retailers functioned with not a camera in sight;

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Acknowledgement: NZ Herald

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Those days now seem long gone.

Perhaps this is the price of “progress”?

Ironically, the advent of the Surveillance State and Surveilled Society has been long foreseen by academics, writers, activists, etc. As surveillance increased – both State and commercial – the public became more and more inured to every-present prying eyes.

The constant warnings of encroachments into our privacy; against increasing State power; alerting us to the perils of Big Data held by offshore (and domestic) corporations have become a Cry Wolf! to most of the public. Unless you are a left-wing blogger or investigative journalist who become an irritant to The Established Order, the public perceive no threat to their glacial erosion of our privacy.

Couched in terms of “preserving law and order” and/or “fighting terrorism”, people will think little of our own country as a Surveilled Society. Especially if they perceive no “down side” to their personal liberty. Previous warnings of a Big Brother State have – apparently – not become reality.

Like the frog-in-the-pan-of-heating-water fable, fears gradually gave way to blasé acceptance. We have arrived to a society where the presence of literally dozens of  overhead surveillance cameras in a supermarket now barely raises an eyebrow.

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References

Wikipedia: GCSB – History

Parliament: Government Communications Security Bureau and Related Legislation Amendment Bill

Wairarapa Times-Age: First class First St grocer

NZ Herald: (story removed from website)

NZ Law Society: Privacy Commissioner issues guidance on personal information and transparency reporting

Fairfax media: Police apologise to Nicky Hager over Dirty Politics raid as part of settlement

Previous related blogposts

Surveillance laws, Strikebreaking, & Subversive groups

2013 – The Year We Became a Policed Surveillance State

The Growth of State Power; mass surveillance; and it’s supporters

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All images stamped ‘fmacskasy.wordpress.com – thedailyblog.co.nz’ are freely available to be used, with following provisos,

» Use must be for non-commercial purposes.
» Where purpose of use is commercial, a donation to Child Poverty Action Group is requested.
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This blogpost was first published on The Daily Blog on 9 September 2018.

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Awash with alcohol and lies in the Internet Age

3 August 2015 3 comments

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Kilbirnie Pak 'n Save in booze ban after selling to pair of 16-year-olds

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Our country has been described as “awash by alcohol” by more than one observer. In New Zealand, buying alcohol is easier than buying a car fuse at a petrol station. (I know this, I’ve tried.)

On Tuesday 29 July, I noticed the following signage at Kilbirnie’s busy Pak’N’Save supermarket;

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20150728_113215

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Indeed, the entire liquor section at the supermarket – a not inconsiderable area of the complex – had been blockaded by a Great Wall of Loopaper,  chippies, sugary soft-drinks, and other highly-processed, salted snack-foods;

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20150728_160707

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20150728_160743

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Perhaps what really caught my attention was the wording of the yellow signage, at regular intervals adorning the Great Wall;

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20150728_160758

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Liquor products are currently unavailable.

Liquor products are currently unavailable due

to an issue with our liquor license. This will be

resolved by Thursday  30th July.

We would like to apologise for the inconvenience

this issue has caused and we appreciate your

understanding.

Pak N Save

Kilbirnie

 

Really?

Breaking the law and selling liquor to sixteen year olds is defined as an “issue” by Pak N Save’s management?

The term “issue” has supplanted the previous terms that might also be applicable in this case; “problem”; “stuff-up”; or simply, “breaking the terms of our liquor license by illegally selling to young people under 18”.

Any one of those terms would be more honest than a hazy veil of euphemism, referring to losing a liquor license for five days as an “issue”.

Forgetting to reapply for a liquor license might be deemed an “issue”. Selling to under-age kids is a major screw-up. (Also somewhat illegal.)

I wonder if the supermarket’s owner would be as forgiving of a shoplifter caught with a dozen Whittaker’s chocolate bars (Whittakers being better quality than Cadbury, any day) down her blouse, casually apologising for the “issue” of not paying for the goods?

There seems to be a casual – almost dishonest manner – by which the supermarket has presented their transgression to the public. As if National had loaned Pak N Save a couple of their spin-doctors, to minimise any public disapproval of the “issue”.

Our government has the very best of spin-doctors, and we are daily mis-informed; distracted; deflected; and outright lied to by Ministers who have been caught engaged in questionable activities.

John Key’s assertion that a prisoner at Mt Eden Prison “fell” of the balcony, rather than being pushed by fellow in-mates, was his version of Pak N Save’s “issue” with their liquor license;

“One of the claims that had been made, I think, was that someone had been thrown off a balcony – in fact, actually, Serco say that the person jumped off the balcony, or tripped, or fell.”

It is ironic that in the Age of the Internet; of near instantaneous communication and super highways of information, that we have more misinformation; half-truths; “spin”;  and sheer lies thrown at us than ever before.

It is not just alcohol we are awash with – it’s lies.

In the case of politics, the irony is that we, the tax-payer, pay spin-doctors to help government ministers, to lie to us.

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References

Fairfax media: Kilbirnie Pak ‘n Save in booze ban after selling to pair of 16-year-olds

Fairfax media: Corrections Minister looking at options for Serco-run prisons after allegations of ill-treatment

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key's credibility takes a hit

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This blogpost was first published on The Daily Blog on 29 July 2015.

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