Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Kris Faafoi’

1 September: Aotearoa Not for Sale takes it to Porirua (part tahi)

1 September 2012 7 comments

.

.

Aotearoa is Not For Sale-Wellington (ANFS) took the fight to save our state assets to Porirua, where a marquee was set up at the Cobham Court market, under The Canopies…

ANFS organisor/activist, Ariana opened the gig and welcomed onlookers to the event. She stated that the fight against asset sales was by no means a “dunne deal” and New Zealanders up and down the country continued to oppose National’s disastrous agenda.

Ariana pointed out ANFS activists, moving through the crowd, armed  with clip-boards and  circulating the “Keep Our Assets” petition calling for a referendum on the issue,

.

.

A “fly-in-the-ointment” – a bar behind our stand began belting out Irish tunes at an atrocious decibel-level. The loud music nearly drowned out speakers and musicians, even with our speakers on full.

The owner was approached and politely asked to turn his volume down. Despite his bar not even open to the public (at 9am?!), he declined our request, citing some disagreement with the local Council,

.

.

MP for Mana, Kris Faafoi (l), sitting with Te Taku Parai and Kuni Shepherd (r), and  discussing various matters with Ariana,

.

.

Porirua mayor, Nick Leggett  (l); Green MP, Jan Logie, and friend with companion-animal,

.

.

.

Kuni Shepherd, Kaumatua for Te Korowai-Whāriki. and a member of the Mental Health Kaunihera, opened the event with a brief karakia,

.

.

Ariana, thanked the previous speaker and introduced the next speaker, Porirua Mayor, Nick Leggett. Before she handed the microphone to  Mayor Leggett, Ariana remarked that there was no excuse for child poverty in this country, and,

Every chilod in this country should have enough to eat.”

Kia ora to that, Ariana…

.

.

Nick Leggett, stated his personal opposition to state asset sales. He spoke of Council investment  in local facilities which benefitted the community as a whole, not just those who had money to buy services. Mayor Leggett described asset sales as a massive transfer of wealth – the largest in a generation.

He spoke of asset sales as not being a good form of investment for the country, as only a minority benefitted.

Mayor Leggett said that whilst he did not represent the Council, as it had no formal position on this issue, that  as an individual he stood in solidarity with public opposition to asset sales. He added that he welcomed the Aotearoa Not For Sale” movement to the city,

.

.

MP for Mana, Kris Faafoi, then took ‘the stage’ at the microphone.

Mr Faafoi said,

There’s still a whole lot more we can do. We need 60,000 more signatures!”

He said that if asset sales – particularly electricity companies – went  ahead, it would be guaranteed that prices would go up. One power company had already recently raised their retail prices for their customers.

Kris Faafoi  paid tribute to ‘People Power Ohariu’, congratulating their efforts to lobby  MP, Peter Dunne, to review his support for National’s asset sales  agenda. He said,

We can still make Peter Dunne change his mind! Email him at Parliament! peter.dunne@parliament.govt.nz.”

This blogger witnessed several people hurriedly scribbling Dunne’s email address on scraps of paper or notebooks.

.

.

Te Taku Parai, Iwi representative for Ngati Toa, said that he never thought he would grow up to live in a country where homelessness would be so bad. He said that asset sales would not help the poorest people in our society, nor give opportunities for children living in poverty,

.

.

‘John Key’ made an “impromptu visit”.

It must be a tough life, wheeling his  ‘millions’ around, from one shady deal to another,

.

.

Following the speakers, some fantastic entertainment from Joshua Faletutulu, and his sister, Grace (photo to follow). The crowd enjoyed Joshua’s talent with the guitar and singing,

.

.

.

Green MP, Jan Logie, addressing the crowd.

Ms Logie was emphatic in her denunciation of National’s asset-sale agenda, saying that it would achieve nothing except worsen the already wide income gap.  She was particularly scathing of people who were dismissive of the petition and stating their intention to buy into a share float,

People who ignore the petition and want to buy shares are saying, ‘Nah, screw you, I have money and want to make more money.”

She said that people who can’t afford shares will pay in another way, as their power prices rise,

That is not the New Zealand way.”

Ms Logie said we are here to look after each other, not just ourselves and our own enrichment,

.

.

ANFS activist, Shane, and two Porirua locals eager to sign the petition,

.

.

More speakers and musicians followed, along with a surprising resolution to loud music from the   “The Dog Box” and what the owner did next…

.

.

Find out what the owner of   “The Dog Box” did next and click on:  1 September: Aotearoa Not for Sale takes it to Porirua (part rua)

.

*

.

Copyright (c)  Notice

All images are freely available to be used, with following provisos,

  •     Use must be for non-commercial purposes.
  •     Where purpose of  use is  commercial, a donation to Child Poverty Action Group is requested.
  •     For non-commercial use, images may be used only in context, and not to denigrate individuals.
  •      Acknowledgement of source is requested.

.

.

= fs =

Advertisements

Wellington sez Aotearoa is Not for Sale! (Rua)

.

Frank Macskasy  Frankly Speaking   No Asset Sales Wellington 14 July https://fmacskasy.wordpress.com Aotearoa is not for sale

.

Continued from:  Wellington sez Aotearoa is Not for Sale! (Tahi)

.

What we do now, will impact on her future. Asset sales for this generation’s ‘benefit’ will affect how following generations live and work in our country.  This is unfair and  is little more than a form of inter-generational theft.

What will this young lady think of us when she’s older?

.

.

The link between impending asset sales and the secret Trans Pacific Partnership  Agreement (TPPA) cannot be underestimated. The Agreement will be the vehicle through which our State Assets – currently own by all New Zealanders – will eventually end up in foreign ownership.

The Free Trade Agreement with China has already resulted in the sale of 16 Crafar farms to Chinese investors.

Dear Leader said that he would not like to see New Zealanders as “tenants in our own country” – yet that is precisely the road that he is driving New Zealand down on,

.

.

Citizens young and old, listened to speakers who addressed the crowd,

.

.

CTU Economist and Director of Policy, Bill Rosenberg, addressing the rally, and explaining why asset sales is a really, really bad idea,

.

.

Mother and children… she must’ve been wondering what sort of future we will be leaving  our kids,

.

.

A sign that has appeared in over 16 towns and cities, on a nationwide day of action,

.

.

The crowd gave koha to cover the costs of organising and setting up the Protest rally. Some gave gold coins, others slipped $20 dollars into the jar,

.

.

.

Entertainment provided by musician, Billy Naylor,

.

.

Onlookers looking at someone who appears on the scene,

.

.

.

“John Key” broke in to Kris Faafoi’s speech to tell the crowd he had made a wheelbarrow full of money by selling every third or fourth word from our national anthem,

.

.

“John Key” proceeded to sing the “new, revised” anthem,

http://frankly-speaking-blog.tumblr.com/private/27253031438/tumblr_m775z00vlZ1rbqecu

There was mixed reaction  when “John Key” announced he had sold the trademark name “New Zealand” and henceforth we’d be calling our country “Aotearoa”.

“John Key” then happily pushed  his wheelbarrow of  “billions of  dollars” – the dirty proceeds from  dirty little deal-making,

.

.

.

Blogger, Alistair, distracting “John Key” with a bit of boogey-dancing, whilst the people took back the loot from Key’s wheel-barrow of ill-gotten gains,

.

.

Alastair was interviewed by the Radio NZ journo, who asked him,

* why I was there?

I said that I was concerned about the sale of what is effectively a natural monopoly.

* Asked about the main reason why people in general are so concerned?

I said that people have been burned before, citing Telecom as an example of us being ripped off during the years when technological limitations meant that it remained a natural monopoly.

* I was challenged with the idea that the power companies could be run more efficiently in private hands (or words to that effect)?

I pointed out that the power companies are current well run and wouldn’t have sufficient capital value to sell if they weren’t. I also noted foreign investors’ tendency to starve capital investment, with the result being a loss of productivity within the organisation.

* I told the reporter that higher power prices were my main concern, not so much because of the immediate effect of paying more, but because of the downstream effects of low income people having no spare capacity in their budgets.

Well said, Alastair! Excellent responses!

.

.

“No Deal” – a fitting response to John Key’s “Deal or No Deal”. In this case, however, John Key is playing with assets that belong to us, the people,

.

.

The crowd seemed to grow as the afternoon progressed. Passers-by stopped; watched; and many signed the petition,

.

.

Another of the Convenors, Aroha Priest, Mana whenua from Atiawa, addressing the crowd and reminding them of the cultural history and heritage of  our beautiful country,

.

.

Ms Priest introduced 8-year old Jireh Pirihi, who in turn  gave a brief talk to the rally. A very courageous young lad – perhaps a future Prime Minister?

.

.

Which was followed by an emotion-laden  dance by  Ms Priest, Jireh, and others,

.

.

.

.

Marama Te Kira,  using here amazingly beautiful voice with some lovely singing,

.

.

And finally,  Ariana Paretutanganui-Tamati thanking everyone for attending the Rally and encouraging everyone to keep fighting National’s asset-sales programme,

.

.

All up, it was a peaceful, dignified protest. In fact, there was no police presence at all (which was quite surprising).   The media gave brief, limited  coverage on TV1, but otherwise it will be up to the internet and social media to report the event fully.

The message continues tgo be sheeted home to John Key and National; our state assets belong to us, and we demand that the privatisation programme be scrapped. Quite simply, Aotearoa/New Zealand is not for sale!

.

*

.

Copyright (c)  Notice

All images are freely available to be used, with following provisos,

  •     Use must be for non-commercial purposes.
  •     For non-commercial use, images may be used only in context, and not to denigrate individuals.
  •     Acknowledgement of source is requested.

Important Links

Aotearoa Is Not For Sale

Occupy Savvy

.

.

= fs =

Wellington sez Aotearoa is Not for Sale! (Tahi)

.

.

Despite a cold, wet afternoon, with intermittant drizzle drenching the city, about 200 hundred people of all ages, race, etc, gathered in Cuba Mall on 14 July.

We were ‘greeted’ by this chap, who had his own ‘beef’ with John Key and a somewhat odious aspect of the recent 2012  Budget,

.

.

This blogger chatted briefly with the gentleman, who was passing out leaflets on this particular issue. In fact, he has a fairly strong point; taxing paperboys and girls for what tiny amounts they happen to earn  reeks of a miserly desperation from  National.

At the same time, the main beneficiaries of the 2009 and 2010 taxcuts were the richest 10% of New Zealanders.

For some reason, taxing children whilst giving more money to the wealthy constitutes “fairness” in the minds of John Key and Bill English…

Approaching the main protest rally, by the Bucket Fountain, we saw this young man. The sign he was holding seemed more than appropriate,

.

.

Signs stuck to park benches in the Mall. One sez, ” We are the average mum and dad and we don’t want our assets sold off “.

I disagree with this sign; there’s nothing average about the good folk who attended this protest. They are each outstanding in their own way, and love their country very much. Definitely above-average, patriotic  folk!

.

.

The message was clear and simple, WE DON’T WANT OUR ASSETS SOLD!!

.

.

One of the organisers of the Protest,

.

.

Bronwyn, from the Labour Party. Where ever there is a just cause to fight, Bronwyn will stand up and be counted. We just need another 4,399,999 like her – and John Key is going downnnn,

.

.

“Zombie economics” – a valid description. Zombies stagger along; oblivious to everything; obsessed; and a menace to everyone. Hmmm, I think we’ve just described John Key and the National Party.

But unlike zombies, we’re not allowed to shoot them. (That’s still a no-no.)

We can, however, vote them out. Much better than shooting them. (And less messy.)

.

.

People were queueing up to sign the petition calling for a Citizens Initiated Referenda to put a halt to asset sales. There simply didn’t seem to be enough clipboards to go around,

.

.

.

TV1 News and Radio NZ were present to report the event. Sadly there was no sign of TV3 or any other media,

.

.

Members of the public chatted and shared their views on issues,

.

.

Interestingly, there was no police presence at any time during the Protest rally.  Similar past events have all been peaceful, and no doubt our police had better things to do with their time. Like catching crooks.

Don’t forget John Key and his accomplices, Constable…

.

.

Labour’s, Kris Faafoi, was the only Member of Parliament present, and we chatted on issues surrounding state assets and how they might be protected from future National governments,

.

.

Aroha Priest, one of the Convenors of the rally, addressed the crowd. Other speakers and entertainers included Koro Alex, who opened with a mihi and karakia;  Terry Shore (musician); John Maynard (People’s Power Ohariu); Howard  Philips (Rail & Maritime Union); Labour’s Kris Faafoi; and others.

.

.

Someone who obviously understood economic and fiscal issues, and how their impact on other nations serve as a dire  warning for us,

.

.

Obviously a cold, wet afternoon – but folk were not deterred,

.

.

.

.

The ones who will be most affected by John Key and his crazy plans for privatisation; our children.  If National’s right wing agenda succeeds, what kind of  society will our youngsters grow up in?

.

.

Many folk realise the close connection between state asset sales and the secretly-negotiated, extremely-dodgy, Trans Pacific Partnership agreement. Both have implications for our society that we can only begin to guess at,

.

.

A presence from the Maritime Union  was good to see. Considering the  vicious attack mounted against Maritime workers  by the POAL board and management, and various right wing reactionaries, it is reassuring to have these gutsy guys standing alongside us,

.

.

Alastair (in blue jacket) – a well-known People’s Journalist, who reports many of these events on his Facebook page,

.

.

This image shows the wide range of ages of New Zealanders who are staunchly opposed to the sale of our State assets. This is not an issue for “young radicals” or “Grey Power” – this issue cuts across age, gender, incomes, race, etc. Quite simply, these are our assets that Key and his cronies are about to flog off,

.

.

A simple enough message for Dear Leader,

.

.

Continued at:  Wellington sez Aotearoa is Not for Sale! (Rua)

.

*

.

Copyright (c)  Notice

All images are freely available to be used, with following provisos,

  •     Use must be for non-commercial purposes.
  •     For non-commercial use, images may be used only in context, and not to denigrate individuals.
  •     Acknowledgement of source is requested.

Important Links

Aotearoa Is Not For Sale

Occupy Savvy

.

.

= fs =

Three Jokers and an Ace

.

.

This has been one of those strange weeks that only a National-led government can give us. Part of that strangeness has been described in a previous blog, with the antics of  Paula Bennett, Pita Sharples, and a slow train-wreck called ACT.

See: 20 May: End of the Week Bouquets, Brickbats, & Epic Fails

But before the weekend was over, there was more neo-liberal nonsense to follow. One thing you can always count on with the Nats – they’re good for a facepalm on a regular basis…

First Joker: David Carter

Local Government Minister, David Carter’s performance on TVNZ’s  Q+A, on  20 May,  was an exercise in National’s  ‘Daddy State‘ policies revving up several notches.

Not content with forcing assets sales, fracking, and deep sea drilling on us – the NPPB (National Party Politburo of Bunnies)  is now issuing diktats from on-high to local body councils.

Firstly, Kommissar Karter instructed local bodies what was  acceptable “core services” by local body councils,

GREG

Okay, core services – what on earth are core services? Because there seems to be a lot of scope in what a core service is and what a council should be taking care of.

DAVID

Well, it’s certainly clear what core services are, and they are rates and rubbish and water, et cetera. But this legislation’s not about saying to councils, ‘You can only embark on core services.’ It is still the responsibility of the council to engage with its community and find out what services that community wants. But we want that debate to be far more transparent than it has been in the past.

GREG

Well, hold on. It sounds like the Government’s wanting a bob each way in this. They’re wanting to say they keep in touch with what’s happening with the rates, but they’re only to go and do core services at a local level or not. Which way is it to go?

DAVID

We are not saying that councils can only do core services. If you take my Christchurch City Council, for example, and it runs the Ellerslie Flower Show in Hagley Park. You could argue that’s not a core service. The council has determined that there is value in delivering that show for the people of Christchurch, and, frankly, I meet a lot of people on planes who are travelling from all over New Zealand to come to that. The council’s decision is to run the Ellerslie Flower Show, and that is a decision for the council to make. It’s certainly not a decision for central government to make or for myself as minister.  “

Then the Minister advised the Great Unwashed what was not acceptable “core services”,

”  DAVID

We’re certainly going to get local government to be far more focused on what activities it undertakes. In the past, some councils have stepped too far and undertaken activities, Hamilton city, for example, with the Grand Prix racing. I think that was an activity that went far beyond where local government should have gone. It cost local government in that area a lot of money. We’re not saying you cannot run race cars; we’re saying you need to think very very carefully before undertaking that activity. And by putting these financial management tests in place, I think councils will think more carefully about some of those longer-term extraneous activities they’re undertaking than they did in the past.  “

So according to Kommissar Karter,

  • V8 car races – out
  • Flower shows – in
  • Asset sales – in
  • local democracy to choose our own expenditure: out
  • centralised, National Party control over expenditure: in
  • core service by councils – tba

The Minister then added, for good measure in case the proles had not understood his Diktat from On High,

”  DAVID

You’re hitting on the essence of the relationship that should be between local government and central government. It has to be truly a partnership, but it’s not on for local government then to step into the space which is clearly central government’s role. And it is central government’s role to establish the education system in this country. It is central government’s role to establish parameters of measuring the success of that. We can then work with Len Brown and his council, particularly as he tries to develop solutions to some of the social problems in South Auckland, and we’re happy to work with him in a partnership. But the core responsibility still remains with central government.

Which, if implemented, would mean that Otorohanga’s Council-led  and community-based initiatives – which has seen unemployment and youth problems plummet – would not be a core Council responsibility?

.

Frank Macskasy Frankly Speaking Blog

Full story

.

Had National’s policy of curtailing Council activities been in full-force, youth unemployment and associated problems would remain unchanged, or probably much worse in that small town.

See also:  Youth unemployment a growing problem

Or was the Minister expecting Otorohanga to wait for Central Government to address the worsening crisis of youth unemployment? Youth unemployment which has rocketed from 58,000 to 87,000 this year?

How would National’s policy, to “reign in” local Councils,  impact on other towns and cities that attempted to take steps to address our growing social problems? Would Auckland prohibited from pursuing a programme similar to Otorohanga?

.

Frankly Speaking Frank Macskasy Blog

.

David Carter’s performance on Q+A was simply breath-taking. If anyone thought that Labour was guilty of  creating a “Nanny State” – they had to watch Carter to see National go several steps further. In effect, central government will be dictating to local bodies what they can or can’t do.

Democracy? Not in our towns or cities, according to Minister Carter.

National is taking over. Curfew at 7PM.

See transcript: Q+ALocal Government Minister David Carter interview

See video:   Q+A: Local Government Minister David Carter (15:28)

The irony here is that whilst National stands by and watches unemployment soar, local communities, through their elected representatives,  are taking steps to address this growing problem.

Meanwhile, National’s response to unemployment is not to implement job creation programmes – their  response is to fiddle with welfare.

Which leads us to the next issue…

.

Second Joker: Paula Rebstock

Q+A’s interview with Paula Rebstock – appointed by Welfare Minister Paula Bennett to head a board to oversee the implementation of National’s welfare “reforms” – is continuing National’s mission to demonise the unemployed; widows; solo-mums (but never solo-dads), and others who rely on social welfare to survive.

Since National has no job-creation plan,  Dear Leader and Paula Bennett are shifting responsibility for lack of jobs onto welfare beneficiaries. (Because we know that welfare pays for the mansion, limousine in the drive-way, and the beach house in Hawaii. Oh, wait, no, that’s John Key.)

It is a most pernicious form of scape-goating.

It is shameful, and panders to the nasty prejudices that reside in the dark depths of our vestigial reptilian hind-brain. For the Working and Middle Classes, who have always had the sneaking suspicion that welfare offers an opulent lifestyle – until they themselves are made redundant – only to then discover the true nature of just how paltry welfare actually is.

To put this issue into some context, New Zealand’s unemployment doubled after the global financial crisis and resulting recession,

.

Frank Macskasy Frankly Speaking Blog

Source

.

Rebstock headed the infamous “Welfare Working Group” in 2010. Some of the  recommendations of the WWG were so punitive and inhumane as to return to the Victorian Era. Even John Key was moved to reject many of Rebstock’s extreme proposals.

In November 2010, Rebstock was interviewed by Paul Holmes on Q+A,

”  PAUL

So that means a bit of government intervention, that means government providing these [jobs], presumably.

PAULA

Well, I don’t know if it does, and I think this is a really important point. If we look at how the labour market in New Zealand has performed, it is true we’ve been in a recession and we’re now moving into a slow recovery and jobs have been an issue, but since 1986 this economy has created more than 500,000 jobs. Now, it responded as well as almost any economy in the world to the economic environment. We had one of the highest employment rates in the OECD. I think that it is a little bit of a cop-out to say that we can’t deal to some of the issues around long-term benefit dependency because of the job market.

PAUL

Oh, come on, Paula, the jobs simply aren’t there. I mean, if you look at 2006, there was a 30,000 net gain of jobs. In 2008 it had gone down a bit – 9,000 net gain. God knows what it is this year.

PAULA

We actually are experiencing a gain in jobs. The labour statistics that came out last week show that. I’m not saying that we haven’t been in a recession, Paul, but this is the time right now to prepare people for the recovery. They need to be ready to take the jobs that are there.  “

See:  Holmes interviews Paula Rebstock (15 November 2010)

Unfortunately for everyone, the jobs were not “out there”.  With the recession is full swing, exports were down, and companies were laying off staff in their hundreds.

Unemployment in November 2010 was 6.4%. By January 2011, it had reach 6.8%. The rate moved up and down, and currently sits on 6.7%.

See:  Unemployment rate lifts to 6.7pc

Fast forward 18 months, and despite the economy continuing to stagnate, National is pursuing it’s scape-goating of unemployed and solo-mothers (but never solo-dads), and Rebstock and Bennett are both  still ‘singing the same song’.

On 16 May, Bennett said,

The cost of today’s total number of beneficiaries is estimated at $45 billion. It makes good economic and social sense to provide targeted support up front to get more people into work sooner.

This new approach will be embedded at all levels of the welfare system and the board will be responsible for ensuring accountability and overseeing the delivery of reforms that will see fewer people on welfare for long periods.

See:  Minister defends new welfare board

Not. One. Word. About. Job. Creation.

National is displaying an almost Obsessive-Compulsive antipathy on welfare issues.  Their sole focus is on welfare and welfare beneficiaries.

As if 80,000+ New Zealanders decided to chuck in their jobs in the last few years, and instead live the life of luxury on $204.96 a week (net).

See:   WINZ  Unemployment Benefit (current)

Yet, not too long ago (29 April), Social Welfare Minister Paula Bennett actually admitted,

PAULA         
No. There’s not a job for everyone that would want one right now, or else we wouldn’t have the unemployment figures that we do.

See:  TVNZ Q+A: Transcript of Paula Bennett interview (29 April)

So why is National spending $1.1 million on Rebstock’s ‘Work and Income Board’ to oversee WINZ – when it ain’t welfare that’s broke. It’s the job market that is 160,000 jobs short?!

See:  Rebstock to head welfare watchdog panel

Bennett goes on to say,

”  I’ve got fantastic frontline staff, I’ve got fantastic upper and middle management that are working hands on with policy changes and implementing that frontline.  “

“Fantastic front line staff”.

“Fantastic upper and middle management”.

“Working hands on with policy changes”.

But no jobs.

.

Third Joker: John Key

National’s “Gateway” scheme had its origins during the Mana by-election, in 2010. As some will recall, it was National’s grand plan to beat the Labour candidate, Kris Faafoi.

National’s candidate was… Hekia Parata – the current Minister for Education.

Ms Parata lost by 1,406 votes to Labour’s candidate. (The margin widens when adding centre-left votes for the Greens and Matt McCarten.)

See: Mana By-election 2010

It appears that the “Gateway” scheme was little more than an election bribe for Mana voters; a “lolly” to entice people to vote for Parata.  National lost, and were stuck with fulfilling their policy pledge.

(Damned inconvenient when that happens, I guess.)

.

Full Story

.

Heatley touted the scheme, grandly proclaiming,

It is important the government provides opportunities for people to move into home ownership. Affordable homes schemes such as Gateway is another way we can assist more people into a home of their own.”

But by May of this year, it seems that it was ‘no longer important the government provides opportunities for people to move into home ownership’.

John Key announced it’s cancellation last week.

For a man who was raised in a taxpayer funded, and subsidised, state home with his siblings and widowed mum, and who benefitted from a societal  value that decent housing was a basic human right – John Key has some very strange attitudes toward providing shelter for the poor and vulnerable,

.

Full story

.

The Gateway scheme details,

GATEWAY SCHEME
* For first home buyers earning under $100,000 a year
* They can get a mortgage to build or buy a house on state land
* Must have at least a 10% deposit
* Have 10 years to buy the land

It’s interesting to note that Key is unable to deliver “low cost” housing for couples earning under$100,000 and says,

The Government has looked at that programme and decided that’s now not the most effective way of going forward.

So we think the capacity for lower income New Zealanders to own their own home is greatly enhanced by the fact interest rates are lower.

“If you have a look at the average home owner in New Zealand, they are paying about $200 a week less in interest than they were under the previous Labour Government.” – Ibid

His comments raises several issues,

  1. It says a lot about Key’s impression of what constitutes “lower income New Zealanders” when the threshold is up to $100,000 per couple. Perhaps by his multi-million dollar standards, a couple on $100,000 is “poor”?
  2. Derides the previous Labour government and claims credit for lower interest rates, by stating “they are paying about $200 a week less in interest than they were under the previous Labour Government“. As if current low interest rates are a result of National’s intervention? (Interest rates are determined by the Reserve Bank, and are currently low because our economy is stagnant. National can take credit for the latter, but not the former.)
  3. How can  providing decent, affordable housing for low income earners  be “not the most effective way of going forward” ?
  4. Key is living in a millionaire’s fantasyland if he seriously believes that “ the capacity for lower income New Zealanders to own their own home is greatly enhanced by the fact interest rates are lower“.  Dear Leader doesn’t understand that the interest rate can be irrelevant if people can’t afford to buy a home in the first place.

If ever there was ever an instance of the Silver Spoon mentality – look no further than our current Prime Minister, the Rt Honourable John Key.

New Zealanders are deluded if they think this man can relate to their ordinary, everyday, lives.

.

The Ace: John Tamihere

As mentioned in a previous blogpost, John Tamihere is hosting an excellent, low-key, intelligent, current affairs chat show on TV3 (Sunday mornings) called “Think Tank“.  Last Sunday’s (20 May) episode focused on child poverty in New Zealand and what practical steps were required to address this growing social crisis.

Last week, it was pokie machines and their effects on communities.

As the show’s name suggests, the goal is not just to look into critical social issues – but to come up with solutions.  The show’s panel of four people offers solutions; and the guests scrutinises each suggestion.

It’s a chat show for sure – but instead of superficial inanities, the conversation is serious and fit for adult consumption.

This is good television. This treats the viewer as   intelligent and capable of considering complex issues.

This blogger can only live in hope that this is the turning point of 21st century television, and we are seeing an end (or at least slow reduction) of the execrable rubbish we have been served up, since  commercialisation and dumbing down became the norm for broadcasting in this country.

John Tamihere is perfect for the role of host for the show. Not a polished or trained media front-person, John Tamihere has walked the hard yards in life and has moved from the tough neighbourhoods of South Auckland to the halls of power in Parliament. He’s lived life. He’s seen things that Middle Class New Zealand has no wish to see or experience, outside of comfortable television shows.

This blogger’s only criticisms revolve around scheduling and lack of promotion.

Scheduling “Think Tank” on Sunday mornings ghettoises the show. It relegates it almost as an ‘after thought’.  It would be an act of naked political subversion to broadcast it during prime time viewing. (That should give National’s/NZ on Air’s,   Stephen McElrea something to howl about!)

The show also needs more promo on TV3. This blogger discovered it only by sheer fluke. Not promoting it leaves us wondering if TV3 doesn’t really want to draw attention to it? Perhaps doesn’t want to draw the ire of certain National Party ministers?

One hopes not.

TV3, as your print-media colleagues used to say, Publish and be damned !

It’s a good show.

Be proud of it.

.

*

.

Media sources

Loans for housing on crown land

Holmes interviews Paula Rebstock (15 November 2010)

Otorohanga’s success story

Council goes solo to help young jobless

Key backs cut-off for cheap homes plan

Minister defends new welfare board

TVNZ  Q+A: Local Government Minister David Carter (video)

Reserve Bank to keep OCR unchanged though hikes flicker on horizon

References

Official Cash Rate (OCR) decisions and current rate

Previous blogposts

Fear and loathing in the Fascist State of New Zealand

Bennett confirms: there are not enough jobs!

.

.

= fs =