Fact Sheet: DPB statistics 1999 – 2012

The numbers of sole parents on the DPB is actually falling,

In the early 1970s, 70 out of every 1,000 teenagers had a child in any year. By the mid-1980s the figure had fallen to 30 per 1,000. Subsequently, it varied between 30 and 35 per 1,000 until 1997. There has been a general downward trend in the last five years, and in 2002 the fertility rate for teenagers was at a historical low of 25.6 per 1,000.

http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/population/births/teenage-fertility-in-nz.aspx

In fact, up until the Global Financial Crisis (which is the excuse this government uses when convenient), the number of solo-parents on the DPB was actually falling,

“Between September 2013 and September 2012:

The number of recipients of Sole Parent Support decreased by 7,268, or 8 percent.”

https://www.msd.govt.nz/about-msd-and-our-work/publications-resources/statistics/benefit/post-sep-2013/sole-parent-support/september-2013-quarter.html#Keyfacts1

In fact, here are the numbers of those on the DPB;

December 1999: 110,285 (http://www.msd.govt.nz/documents/about-msd-and-our-work/newsroom/factsheets/benefit/2004/fact-sheet-dpb-04-dec-31.doc)
December 2000: 109,663 (http://www.msd.govt.nz/documents/about-msd-and-our-work/newsroom/factsheets/benefit/2005/headline-benefit-numbers-05-dec-31.doc)
December 2001: 109,047 (http://www.msd.govt.nz/documents/about-msd-and-our-work/newsroom/factsheets/benefit/2006/fact-sheet-dpb-06-dec-31.doc)
December 2002: 109,290 (http://www.msd.govt.nz/documents/about-msd-and-our-work/newsroom/factsheets/benefit/2007/fact-sheet-dpb-07-dec-31.doc)
December 2003: 111,065 (http://www.msd.govt.nz/documents/about-msd-and-our-work/newsroom/factsheets/benefit/2008/fact-sheet-dpb-08-dec-31.doc)
December 2004: 109,339 (http://www.msd.govt.nz/documents/about-msd-and-our-work/newsroom/factsheets/benefit/2004/fact-sheet-dpb-04-dec-31.doc)
December 2005: 106,302 (http://www.msd.govt.nz/documents/about-msd-and-our-work/newsroom/factsheets/benefit/2005/headline-benefit-numbers-05-dec-31.doc)
December 2006: 100,309 (http://www.msd.govt.nz/documents/about-msd-and-our-work/newsroom/factsheets/benefit/2006/fact-sheet-dpb-06-dec-31.doc)
December 2007: 98,154 (http://www.msd.govt.nz/documents/about-msd-and-our-work/newsroom/factsheets/benefit/2012/december/fact-sheet-dpb-12-dec-31.doc)
December 2008: 100,282 (http://www.msd.govt.nz/documents/about-msd-and-our-work/newsroom/factsheets/benefit/2008/fact-sheet-dpb-08-dec-31.doc)
December 2009: 109,289 (http://www.msd.govt.nz/documents/about-msd-and-our-work/newsroom/factsheets/benefit/2009/december/fact-sheet-dpb-09-dec-31.doc)
December 2010: 112,865 (http://www.msd.govt.nz/documents/about-msd-and-our-work/newsroom/factsheets/benefit/2010/december/fact-sheet-dpb-10-dec-31.doc)
December 2011: 114,230 (http://www.msd.govt.nz/documents/about-msd-and-our-work/newsroom/factsheets/benefit/2011/december/fact-sheet-dpb-11-dec-31.doc)
December 2012: 109,118 (http://www.msd.govt.nz/documents/about-msd-and-our-work/newsroom/factsheets/benefit/2012/december/fact-sheet-dpb-12-dec-31.doc)

You’ll note that numbers on the DPB started to drop after 2003 – and only started to rise post-2008, when the recessionary effects of the Global Financial Crisis impacted on us.

Perhaps it’s not a coincidence that unemployment dropped to around 3.4% in the mid-2000s, and NZ even experienced a labour shortage;

“Labour shortage holds back growth”
http://fmacskasy2.files.wordpress.com/2012/04/labour-shortage-holds-back-growth-2-12-2002.jpg

“Skills shortage delays building”
http://fmacskasy2.files.wordpress.com/2012/04/skills-shortage-delays-building-25-11-2002.jpg

“Skill shortage restrains firms”
http://fmacskasy2.files.wordpress.com/2012/04/skill-shortage-restrains-firms-20-11-2002.jpg

“Wellington short of skills”
http://fmacskasy2.files.wordpress.com/2012/04/wellington-short-of-skills-28-10-2002.jpg

“Labour shortage here to stay so we had better get used to it”
http://fmacskasy2.files.wordpress.com/2012/04/labour-shortage-here-to-stay-so-we-had-better-get-used-to-it-24-10-2002.jpg

The evidence is fairly clear; numbers on welfare – including the DPB – depends on availability of jobs. Not because of any cliched “lifestyle choice”.

Otherwise the numbers on the DPB would not have dropped between 2003 and 2008.

Only the Global Financial crisis reversed that trend.

.

.

= fs =

Advertisements
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: