Home > Global, Social Issues > Life in lockdown, Round Two – Day 1

Life in lockdown, Round Two – Day 1

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18 August: Day 1 of living in lock-down…

 

Day’s beginning.

Current covid19 cases: 5

Cases in ICU: –

Number of deaths: –

After a night of torrential rain bursts and thunderous blasts of lightning, I wake up to Round Two of life under lockdown. The weather is overcast outside; the roads wet from last nights downpour. This is a good sign; people may be less inclined to sneak of down to the beach or summer baches for a long weekend.

Sorting through my revised roster of reassigned clients. Thankfully most are staunch and understand the severity of the crisis.

Listening to the radio, vox populi interviews of Kiwis in various centres, I am struck at the stiff-upper-lip response from people. The lock-down is considered necessary; people point to the cluster-f**k that is Sydney; “we can do this, we’ve done it before”. I am reminded of WW2 stories of British people during the blitz; calm resignation and determination to see it through.

Only one jarring, dissenting voice from the South Island who whines like a six year old that only the North Island should’ve been locked down because the outbreak was a North Island thing:

But Matt Radcliffe said the South Island should not have been forced to lock down for a case in the North Island.

“We’re like sheep aren’t we. Yeah, I think it is over the top. You know, one case, if it is one case in the North Island… Australians can lock down a state, why can’t New Zealand lock down an island, if it’s in the north, shut down the North Island.”

Australians can lock down a state” has to be the most moronic statement since David Seymour prattled on about plastic bags. Obviously Mr Radcliffe is living in blissful ignorance at how Delta has slipped through one state after another because NSW did not opt for a full lockdown.

Contrast with this person, who really was the adult in the room:

In central Dunedin, Carolyne Smith said anything less than level four would have risked a New South Wales-type scenario.

“I mean if we go for sharp and hopefully short, we’ll knock it on the head, but I think if Jacinda and Ashley had gone for say level three or anything like that, they would have been just wide open to letting it go.”

The drive into Wellington took me along my usual route; down SH2 to the motorway; through the Terrace Tunnel; down Ghuznee Street, toward the Basin Reserve and then the Eastern Suburbs.

Traffic along the way. Definitely busier than the last L4 lockdown last year. Whilst hard to put a firm number, counting at any moment indicated twice the level of traffic than last year.

And there seemed to be more tradies on the motorway and city streets with their vans, utes, flat decks, et al. Plus a coca cola delivery truck – because carbonated soft drinks, as we all know, are critical to our wellbeing.

Near deserted suburban park-and-ride carparks. Normally filled to overflowing onto adjacent streets, only half a dozen cars  sat under a gloomy, chilly gray sky…

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The drive into town (and on the way home later that night) was marked by the presence of police vehicle. One sighted on SH2; another in Victoria Street, south of the Terrace Tunnel; and one parked up on the grassy central berm in Cobham Drive, connecting the city to the airport. This was in marked contrast to last year, when police were curiously absent from streets and motorway.

As mentioned above, traffic on the motorway was noticeably heavier than last year’s lockdown. More trucks; vans, utes – both marked and unmarked.

The number of vans and utes with electricians and plumbers markings indicated that either these people were still on the job, or perhaps were nipping down to their local super market for milk, bread, and nappies.

Last year I listed the markings on commercial vehicles. But I also missed many more travelling in the opposite direction. I may or may not continue the practice…

But certainly will observe and diary events, incidences, and people being people as I witness them.

Meanwhile, as I entered the deserted streets of Wellington…

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Looking north along Cuba Street, toward Cuba Mall…

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Coca cola-branded delivery truck. Both delivery persons wore masks. One over his face (good). The other under his chin (not so terribly good)…

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At Evans Bay marina, where campervans were permitted by Council by-laws to park-up. It remains to be seen if these vehicles stay put for the next few days…

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As I left my last client and headed to my car, I stood in a Miramar street not far from the Weta Workshops.  Unlike last year, the high-pitched sound of a turbo-prop aircraft accelerating to take-off still filled the dark night. A marked difference from the dead still silence from April 2020.

Tonight I headed home. Wednesdays was usually spent with my partner; dinner; something interesting to watch on TV or Youtube (Chris Hedges and Seth Myers are strong favourites). But tonight was to be spent home, alone. We have separate “bubbles” with mine being far more extended than hers because of my community work.

At least my cat would be happy to see me.

By Day’s End.

As trhe day came to a close, our covid toll had doubled…

Current covid19 cases: 10

Cases in ICU: –

Number of deaths: –

So ended the first day of our journey to beat this thing.

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References

RNZ: South Island settles in for level 4: ‘That’s the sacrifice we’ve got to make’

RNZ: Microbiologist slams ‘irresponsible’ plastic ban claims cited by Seymour

Other Blogs

The Standard: The importance of political leadership in dealing with Covid

The Standard: Here again, but Delta gives less latitude. So give less latitude.

Previous related blogposts

Life in Lock Down: Day 33 & 34

Life in Lock Down: Day 2 of Level 3

Life in Level 1: Reinfection – Labour’s kryptonite

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Acknowledgement: Slane

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Have your own thoughts? Leave a comment. (Trolls need not bother.)

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= fs =

  1. 20 August 2021 at 3:05 am

    Goods still need to be delivered to the few shops that can open and some tradies do jobs that are necessary even in a pandemic. For example, electrical faults are serious and potentially putting lives at risk. Sometimes it’s not obvious what essential work certain people do so it’s best not to judge them when you see them on the road.

    • 20 August 2021 at 9:00 am

      Thanks for input, Miles.

      SomehowI don’t think coca cola is an essential item. They were delivering sugary carbonated drinks, not food, as far as I could determine.

      As for the tradies. Let’s hope you’re right. I’d hate to think they were flouting the lockdown – put in place to save lives – just to carry out minor repairs or reno.

    • 20 August 2021 at 10:54 am

      Found this on the MoBIE website relating to tradies;

      “Plumbers, electricians, locksmiths, pest controllers and tradespeople can carry out work to address immediate risks to health and safety.”

      ref: https://www.business.govt.nz/covid-19/operating-at-alert-levels/

      So let’s hope the vehicles I’m seeing on the roads are for “immediate risks to health and safety”.

  1. 20 August 2021 at 7:00 am
  2. 21 August 2021 at 8:01 am
  3. 24 August 2021 at 8:00 am
  4. 25 August 2021 at 8:32 pm
  5. 27 August 2021 at 10:00 pm
  6. 29 August 2021 at 4:31 pm
  7. 30 August 2021 at 8:01 am
  8. 1 September 2021 at 8:00 am
  9. 2 September 2021 at 8:01 am
  10. 3 September 2021 at 12:02 pm
  11. 5 September 2021 at 8:00 am
  12. 6 September 2021 at 8:01 am
  13. 7 September 2021 at 8:31 am

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