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Archive for 30 July 2012

The Treaty of Waitingi – saving us from our own folly

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Whilst 60% to 70% of New Zealanders opposed state asset  sales, bizarrely 47.31% still voted for National.

See: 2011 general election official results

This blogger knows two tradesmen who voted National last year despite being vehemently opposed to selling state assets.

It’s a quirk of our nature that some folk  vote for things they don’t like or support.  The assets sale issue is another example of  New Zealanders demonstrating a form of political ‘schizophrenia’ and voting for something they dislike.

Go figure.

Luckily – despite not having a US-style Constitution to protect our interests from nutty, neo-liberal National Party  ideology – our  very own Treaty of Waitangi may have  pulled our collective backsides out of the fire, and may be the one, single mechanism that puts a halt to National’s unpopular policy to hock off our property.

The irony of this should be abundantly obvious to all;  the Treaty was orginally designed to protect tangata whenua from the excesses of colonial rule (which was not exactly a stirling success).

Now, 172 years after Te Tiriti was signed, our Founding Document may be the means by which Pakeha are saved from their own collective folly.

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We should hang our heads in shame, and be thankful to Maori. Because of their efforts, our power companies, Solid Energy, and Air New Zealand will not end up being  owned by investors from Beijing, Berlin, or Boston.

We may just have saved something of our treasures for our children to inherit.

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Additional

Radio NZ: Waitangi Tribunal recommends asset sale delay

Dominion Post: Hold off asset sales, Waitangi Tribunal says

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Identifying a hypocrite in three easy steps.

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So poverty is a result of  “poor choices”?

I guess that justifies Dear Leader John Key turning his back on society’s most vulnerable. After all,  “poor choices” justifies blaming the poor for being poor, instead of having $50 million in their bank account.

So Mr Key, how did that free tertiary education and subsidised state house work out for you?

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Categories: Social Issues Tags: , ,