Home > Social Issues, The Body Politic > National prescribes bad medicine for the poor

National prescribes bad medicine for the poor

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Frank Macskasy Blog Frankly Speaking

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National’s tax cuts are coming back to bite us firmly on our collective arses.

In April 2009 and October 2010,  National cut income tax and raised gst from 12.5% to 15%.  Key and English insisted that the tax cuts/gst rise were “fiscally neutral”.

Like so many of National’s statements, that “fiscal neutrality” turned out to be a fiction,

The Green Party has today revealed that the National Government has so far had to borrow an additional $2 billion dollars to fund their 2010 tax cut package for upper income earners.

New information prepared for the Green Party by the Parliamentary Library show that the estimated lost tax revenues from National’s 2010 tax cut package are between $1.6-$2.2 billion. The lost revenue calculation includes company and personal income tax revenues offset by increases in GST.

“The National Government said that their signature 2010 income tax cut package would be ‘fiscally neutral’ – paid for increased revenues from raising GST. That hasn’t happened. The net cost for tax cuts has been about $2 billion,” Green Party Co-leader Dr Russel Norman said today. “

See:   Govt’s 2010 tax cuts ‘costing $2 billion and counting’

As taxation revenue dropped,  National’s deficit has risen alarmingly,

The government took in $1.57 billion less tax than expected in the first nine months of the fiscal year, reflecting a tepid economy, Treasury figures show – reflecting what the Finance Minister says has been a ‘difficult year’.

The Crown took in $39.8 billion in tax in the nine months ended March 31, against a forecast in the Pre-election Economic and Fiscal Update estimate of $41.3 billion, according to the government’s financial statements. “

See:  Govt tax take down by $1.57 billion

Massive borrowings over the last three years has not staunched the bleeding of government revenue. Soon after the April 2009 taxcuts, government revenue had begun to drop,

The Crown accounts for the year to June, released yesterday, showed an all-up deficit of $10.5 billion, compared with a surplus of $2.4 billion the previous year.

The state’s core operations – such as health, education and defence – recorded a deficit of $4.5 billion as tax revenues fell while spending grew. “

See:  $250 million: What our Govt borrows a week

After the October 2010 tax cuts, that borrowing had risen, and by mid-2011 stood at around $380 million a week,

”  The Government is borrowing $380 million a week and next week’s budget will carry a record deficit of about $16 billion, Parliament was told today.

Finance Minister Bill English said the Government’s financial position had deteriorated “significantly” since late 2008.

“The pre-election update in 2008 forecast that the deficit for this year would be $2.4 billion,” he said.

“It’s much more likely to be around $15b or $16b.”

That level of deficit, as NZPA has previously reported, will be the highest in New Zealand’s history and Mr English confirmed that today.  “

See:  Govt borrowing $380m a week

See:  Government debt rises to $71.6 billion

History lesson over.

Test: what can we deduce from tax-cuts – especially made during a recession?

  1. Government revenue will fall.
  2. Government will have to borrow to make up the short-fall.
  3. Goverment will have to either increase taxes or cut services and/or increase User Pays charges for the public.
  4. All of the above.
  5. We don’t have to do anything, because National is a fabulous fiscal manager;  John Key waves his hands; and money magically falls from the sky.

If you, the reader picked anything except Option 4 – feel free to re-read the above and go do some further research on Basic Economics 101.

If you picked Option 5, then you are a  hopelessly committed National supporter.  Seek professional help – stat.

The fact of the matter is that none of the tax-cuts were ever affordable.

Common sense will tell even the most die-hard National groupie that if you reduce revenue, then one  has to cut expenditure and services; borrow to make up the shortfall; raise  user-charges; or all three. There ain’t no other way.

National has borrowed billions – that much is crystal clear from media reporting using  Treasury data.

What the New Zealand public also need to understand is that National will also be cutting expenditure and services and raising user-charges.

National has begun a programme of increasing user-pays charge for,

  • Prescription Charges

Prescription charges will increase from $3 an item to $5 an item in next week’s Budget, as the Government moves to offset the cost of extra health spending in the “zero Budget”.

The new charge will cover up to a maximum of 20 items from January 1 next year, raising $20m in the first year and $40m after that. “

See:  Prescription cost to rise to help pay for Budget

  • Raising the compulsory student loan repayment rate and cutting student allowances,

Up to 5000 students will be affected by the National-led Government’s cut to student allowances, Tertiary Education Minister Steven Joyce revealed this afternoon.  The Government announced a raft of changes to student loan and allowance schemes last week, including a stop to allowances after 200 weeks. “

See: Allowance cuts to affect up to 5000 students

”  The changes would see more than 500,000 people forced to pay back their student loans more quickly and people studying for more than four years would no longer be able to claim an allowance…

… The repayment rate for loans will be increased to 12 per cent from 10 per cent for any earnings over $19,084.

See:  Outrage at student loan changes

  • Government has cut back on the state sector, sacking 2,500 employees, including  60 frontline bio-security border staff.

The cost to our economy, should the Queensland fruit fly take hold, would be in the hundreds of millions. And if foot and mouth ever took hold, the cost to our economy could be in the order of  $10 billion over a two year period!  National is gambling with our economy, simply for the sake of a few million dollars.

Pests such as the Varroa mite and the Psa virus have already taken hold in our environment. The latter, the Psa virus, could impact on our $1.5 billion kiwifruit export industry.

See:  Kiwifruit disease Psa explained

See:  2500 jobs cut, but only $20m saved

See:  Risks involved in cutting MAF Biosecurity jobs

  • Teachers numbers “capped” and class numbers increased.

The ratio of teachers to students in New Zealand schools is set to be changed, Education Minister Hekia Parata announced today.

For year one the ration will remain at one teacher for every 15 pupils while the ratio for those preparing for NCEA exams in years 11-13 will be standardised to one teacher for every 17.3 pupils…

…  The Government is also putting a cap on the number of teachers by keeping it at the present level.

Parata says the Government is not reducing teacher numbers, but claims $43 million can be saved by not hiring any extra teachers. “

See:  Teachers ‘pushed out the door’ in Budget shake up – Greens

The implications of this cost-cutting exercise are mind boggling. Not only will be see class sizes increase, but there is the strong possibility that students with special needs will miss out. Larger class sizes will put extra pressure on teachers and students; make one-on-one teaching harder; and will possibly force many teaching staff to quit or move to Australia.

At a time when our society desperately needs more educated and trained young people, this is a counter-productive step that beggars belief.  Only a bean-counter (unmarried, no children of his/her own) could devise such a crazy proposal.

Ian Leckie, the New Zealand Educational Institute national president, said,

Essentially every child gets less attention, and if we’re ever going to be concerned about what happens for our children, we want them to get the best of service, put more children in the class, it makes it harder for the teacher, harder for children to succeed.”

New Zealand’s youth unemployment currently stands at 83,000 – up from  58,000 last year. How many believe that National’s plan will improve on that dire situation?

See previous blogpost:  Bennett confirms: there are not enough jobs!

How many believe that is not a desperate cost-cutting exercise?

And how many suspect that the “cap” will quickly become staffing cuts – as happened with state sector workers?

  • Government closes down Gateway Scheme – where those on low incomes were assisted to buy there own homes,

Prime Minister John Key says a scheme to provide up to 100 affordable homes at Auckland to people on low incomes is not needed because low interest rates mean there is greater capacity for people to buy their own homes.

Mr Key has been explaining the Government decision to scrap its Gateway scheme to help those on lower incomes buy homes in its flagship Hobsonville Point development, in Auckland.

It would have provided affordable homes in a flagship Auckland housing development but has been wound up with just 17 houses built. “

See:    Low interest cuts need for cheaper houses – Key

See:    Key backs cut-off for cheap homes plan

There will be other cuts to social services and/or rises in User Pays charges.

The net effect is that those who received tax cuts under $40,000 will find that the cuts have been swallowed up. Low and middle income earners may find that they are now not only no better off – but are having to put up with higher government charges and  less services.

Those on $100,000+ p.a.  have done very well.

Those earning $70-$80,000+ p.a. may escape  relatively unscathed.

Low income earners, on minimum wage ($13.50 p/h) or just above,  facing higher prescription charges,  will effectively  be paying for tax cuts for the high-income earners, wealthy, and asset-rich.

If the tax cuts were designed to reduce government expenditure; increase user-pays; and raise incomes for the top 10% – then National has achieved it’s goal.

National is continuing it’s 1990s agenda, albeit more slowly, and stealthily.

I wonder – is this what 1,058,638 New Zealanders voted for, when they cast their ballot for National. More user pays?

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Information

Tax Cuts April 2009

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Frank Macskasy Blog Frankly Speaking  tax cuts april 2009

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Tax Cuts October 2010

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Frank Macskasy Blog Frankly Speaking tax cuts 2010

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By contrast,

Health Minister Tony Ryall said the $5 cost would be applied to the first 20 items of medicine per family each year, so no family would pay more than $100 a year for their prescription costs.

The current maximum for prescription costs was $60 a year. “

See:  Meds price hike: ‘Children will die’

The last word goes to Mana MP, Hone Harawira,

”  Doctors are saying right now that children’s health is being threatened by the price of medicine now. You have to assume that if Government raises that price then children will die as a result of that measure.

I don’t believe that any Government could be so callous.

Absolutely I think that these measures, although it is going to be difficult to prove, will lead to children dying, through the inability of their parents to afford the charges for medicine that are being proposed by this National/Maori Party Government.

Every price rise impacts poor people in a far greater way than it does people on the kinds of levels of income that him and his mates are on. So yes it is going to hurt every poor person in this country – Maori, Pacific and Pakeha”.

See: Ibid

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Additional

Government delivers April 1 2009 tax cuts, SME changes

Budget 2010: What the tax cuts mean for you

Prescription cost to rise to help pay for Budget

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= fs =

  1. Deborah Kean
    18 May 2012 at 5:01 pm

    Oh yes, and I am scared stiff of the actual Budget… it can only be worse!

  2. 18 May 2012 at 5:05 pm

    Debbie, Bill English and John Key keep referring to it as a “zero budget”.

    I believe that term is a euphemism. We may be looking at another Black Budget…

    • Deborah Kean
      20 May 2012 at 3:13 pm

      I fear you may well be right! I am dreading it…
      Deb

  1. 18 May 2012 at 10:52 am
  2. 19 November 2012 at 11:41 pm

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