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Archive for 23 November 2011

Dear Minister…

John-Paul Powley

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Dear Anne Tolley, and John Key

I woke up this morning and read your education policy as summarised in the media. This whole article on your proposed education policy made me furious.  The article suggested that these were the key points:

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EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION:

Target of 98 per cent of new entrants in school having participated in early childhood education by 2015

New interactive website for parents to choose “the best” local ECE service

New funding model to be trialled in 2014

SCHOOLS:

Require publication of National Standards data in 2012

New assessment of “disposition to teach” for trainee teachers

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A long time ago when National Standards were introduced I predicted that they would creep to Secondary schools and that we would  see league tables.  It didn’t bother me that on both points you said this wouldn’t happen.  It was clearly a lie, and it is no comfort to me to see my predictions turn out to be correct.

It seem to me that there is simply no possibility of negotiating with your government in good faith and this makes me angry, because I am a reasonable person who believes that conflict is a dead end.

Here are some points that I would like to address to you:

  • How can you want 98% of kids in early childhood education, but cut the funding to these centres that make them affordable, and how can you want 98% of kids to go to centres where you do not believe that it is important that 100% of the staff there are fully qualified?
  • What does the term “best” ECE centres mean?  Doesn’t this just mean the centres with the wealthiest and best educated parents?  How does a competitive model in education work when some people can’t afford the best, and are you committed in terms of the massive amounts of money and time it will take to build up struggling centres, or is it a fail-and-close-them-down model?
  • You said that you would not create a situation of league tables two years ago.  This was clearly a lie.  Do you think it is a good model to our students to lie in order to get what you want, and then use double speak to try to pretend that you never said such things in the past?
  • League tables are good for comparing apples with apples, but after the first round of tables are printed there will no longer be apples and apples, there will be schools that are better than others when measured against one criteria.   My daughter started school yesterday, and I know the pressure to send your child to the “best” school and not the local school, but I believe in my local school and I was DELIGHTED to send her to the local school and see her running in and playing with the Somali kids, and the Pasifika kids, and the Indian kids, and the European kids all together, learning together, and being wonderful and curious together, and I can’t help but wonder what will happen to all the white kids when the school down the road does better on the league table, because it is a wealthier and more homogenous school.  Are we committed to a multi-cultural New Zealand or not?  Or is that just talk?  Past experience shows that Europeans like me abandon schools that are sinking faster than rats on a sinking ship because they can, and that parents who can’t afford to make the change don’t (even though they care just as much for their children).  I’m not proud of this fact, but I have to admit it is true.  Do you understand this?  I don’t think that you do, and I think that this is the weakness of a party that is made up of a homogenous and wealthy group and would prefer a voting system where they can just stop mucking about and govern alone.  You do not represent everyone, and you should never, ever be allowed to govern alone for that reason.  Not because I do not like you, but because NO ONE should govern alone.
  • Disposition to teach?  My first years teaching in a low decile school were hell.  I went home, lay down on the floor and cried.  If someone had offered me a job doing something else at the moment I would have taken it.  Now I am at the end of my sixth year teaching and I think I do a damn good job.  Teaching is a long hard road to success, and it is even more brutal and even more important at decile one schools.  My experience of a  decile ten school is that the students can almost teach themselves.  Is it not then true that student teachers in higher decile schools will appear to have a better disposition to teach than those toughing it out in low decile schools?  Where do you want good teachers to go?  Into the low decile schools where the results are low, and they will be judged on league tables, and their position will worsen as white flight takes place over the next few years?  I assume that you are also planning to let parents have “choice” about where they send their kids.  Which means abandoning zoning, and abandoning certain schools whose funding is tied to their roll.
  • Can I ask you this?  What was broken about our education system?  One of the best in the world for decade after decade with results we can be proud of in maths, and reading and writing?  Our identified area of concern was our long tail.  A characteristic that all multi-cultural societies face, and one that they are all battling with.  Why have you created a policy that will disadvantage the schools where the long tail is over represented?  I think that it is so parents who are educated and comparatively wealthy (compared to long-tail parents) can have a good reason to send their kids out of area.
  • Finally, I would like you to show me another country similar to our own where this model has worked over a long period of time.

Yours sincerely,

John-Paul Powley

http://manoferrors.wordpress.com

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Additional

 

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Election Eleven – Wednesday

23 November 2011 4 comments

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Election Eleven – Wednesday

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Another stirling free-market “success” story,

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So another 28 workers lose their jobs; go on the unemployment benefit; and get labelled as “dole bludgers” by right wing imbeciles.

This is New Zealand in 2011AD:  Neo-liberal Nirvana.

Tell me, my fellow New Zealanders – you who pride yourself as being fair-minded and always willing to give others a fair go – does the closure of this yarn factory and job losses strike a chord with you? There are hundreds – thousands – of similar businesses like Qualityarns that’ve gone bust since Roger Douglas put his hand up in Parliament and said, “Ive got a great idea!”.

Isn’t it ironic… 28 men and women had a job yesterday. Tomorrow they will be on the dole and suffering bene-bashing.

Along with 154,000 other men and women.

Is this it?

Is this what we have to look forward to? Unemployment for some; low wages for others; mass-migration to Australia; and cheap goods from China, India, etc?

Hullo? Is anyone awake in this country?!?!

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~ ~ ~

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This is frankly a form of economic vandalism. What are we mounting here? An economic development strategy for China?” – David Cull, Mayor of Dunedin

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The latest in John Key’s hard-sell* of our assets,

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Listen to John Key speaking to reporters on asset sale plans

Listen to full interview

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Now let me get this straight…

Key reckons that “National would legislate to create a cap on the shares held in any state assets”?  He adds that,

National would pass a law stating that no individual or company could own more than a 10% share. There’s historical precedent there – Telecom had a cap – it’s just a matter of passing legislation. We’d pass it.” Source

Really?

A couple of points here.

National’s definition of the word “cap” appears to be somewhat different to that expressed in, oh, say, just about every English dictionary in the Known Universe. This government has “capped” the civil service by actively cutting government workers, and making them redundant.

So does the word “cap” mean the same for National as it does for ordinary citizens? Recent events suggest not.

Secondly. I’m not a financial whizz-kid in John Key’s league. I’ve never speculated on a zillion dollars; made a bajillion dollars profit; and banked a squillion dollars commision. My work is somewhat more mundane.

However. Even I know that passing a law to “cap” (definition?) share-ownership at 10% can be easily rorted. I can spot an immediate loophole:

  1. Company A sets up five shelf companies; A1, A2, A3, A4, and A5.
  2. Each Shelf company buys 9%.
  3. Result; parent company A now owns 45%.
  4. And John Key smiles and points to his “success” at preventing any one company from gobbling up the whole lot.
  5. And by registering each shelf company in special company/tax havens, such as Ian Wishart described in “The Paradise Conspiracy” – we’ll never know that Company A has bought up the lion’s share of available shares.
  6. Easy peasy.

I suspect John Key – being somewhat more knowlegeable in such arcane matters – is already aware of such a possibilty.

But I guess he doesn’t want to spoil the nice fairy tale he’s been spinning us…

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(* Hard-sell – as in selling to us what we already own)

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Perhaps the most sober, insightful, and plain-speaking look at where we have arrived as a society, after 27 years of radical, free market, “reforms” and the rise of the “Me” Generation,

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Full Story & On-demand Replay

Facebook: Inside Child Poverty New Zealand

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Every politician; aspiring political candidate; community leader; businessperson; and follower of the “free” market should be made to sit and watch this film. This is how we have made New Zealand.

This is a portrait of a society that has lost it’s soul, in pursuit of money and the illusion of “free choice”.

Watch… and maybe learn.

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Well, well, well… I wonder what other bad news Dear Leader is keeping from us,

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When Goff sprung that on Key, he looked decidedly uncomfortable.

Which is silly, really. Trying to keep political secrets in this country is like trying to carry water in a butterfly net. The question is not if a secret will be made public – but will it make it in time for the 6PM News on TV1 or TV3.

I suspect there will be a few more unpleasant surprises in store for us next year, if National wins the election. Their last three years have indicated to us that, as usual, right wing governments and secret agendas go hand-in-hand.

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Firstly, since when is cutting the same as capping?! National has been actively cutting government jobs – whilst at the same time hiring some very expensive “advisors”. These jobs are men and women who have given many loyal years of service to the country. They are the ones who do the work in the back-room offices, to ensure that phones are answered when we have a query about tax or traffic lights are out, and that essential  services are carried out.

Loading front-line services with more paperwork and other administrative duties seems counter-productive. And people are beginning to resent it, and resist these cost-cutting follies.

So much for our esteemed leader, John Key,  assuring New Zealanders that “there’s no way one in five New Zealanders will lose their jobs“.

Making people unemployed is not helping our economy.

For National to be persisting with this false economy of job cuts is not just hurting the economy and hurting ordinary New Zealanders – it signifies a depressing lack of imagination from the National Party,

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This is National’s “action plan”, if re-elected,

National’s action plan includes:

– Have the budget deficit next year, and be back in surplus in 2014/2015
– Establish the Crown Water Investment Company to invest up to $400 million from the Future Investment Fund in irrigation and water storage to make farm land more productive
– Amend the Resource Management Act to have six-month time limits on consenting medium-sized projects
– Immediately implement the new lower public service staffing cap
– Slow the phasing-in of the Emissions Trading Scheme and allow off-setting for pre-1990 forest owners
– Amend the Social Security Act to comprehensively reform benefits
– Introduce changes to sanctions for beneficiaries whose recreational use of drugs affects their ability to apply for and secure a job
– Change bail laws to make it harder for those accused of the most serious offences to get bail
– Introduce screening of parole applications to allow the Parole Board to reduce the number of unnecessary parole hearings
– Pass the Search and Surveillance Bill
– Make secondary school performance information available to parents
– Immediately begin work to develop more effective teacher and principal appraisal
– Increase the number of elective operations by at last 4000 a year
– Work with district health boards to ensure patients needing a specialist appointment are seen within no more than four months by 2014
– Begin work with local primary care networks to provide free after-hours GP visits to children under six
– Start building 17,000 seat temporary stadium at Addington
– Receive and assess the CBD recovery plan

Source

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No mention of jobs.

But plenty of threats of State  punitive actions,

– Immediately implement the new lower public service staffing cap
– Amend the Social Security Act to comprehensively reform benefits
– Introduce changes to sanctions for beneficiaries whose recreational use of drugs affects their ability to apply for and secure a job
– Change bail laws to make it harder for those accused of the most serious offences to get bail
– Introduce screening of parole applications to allow the Parole Board to reduce the number of unnecessary parole hearings
– Pass the Search and Surveillance Bill

The National Party shows a strong inclination toward  “Daddy Statism”. Lots of punishments. Increases in state police powers (they’ll need them).  And blaming those of welfare for the lack of job-growth in this country.

There is nothing positive in any of this.

And this is what New Zealanders are supporting as a possible government?

Perhaps, collectively, we feel we don’t deserve any better.

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2008

That was then…

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2011

This is now…

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I have the strongest impression that New Zealanders are not just leaving because of higher wages in Australia. There has  be more to it than that.

Could it be that those leaving are seeking a better quality of life? Could it be that the free market reforms have created a “Me Society” where New Zealanders feel disconnected from our own country?

Bryan Bruce’s sobering and thoughtful documentary “Inside NZ: Inside Child Poverty” suggests to me that twentyseven years of free market, user-pays, growing gaps between wealthy and Middle Classes and Poor, and growing underclass has created a sense of alienation and frustration.

The irony is that John Key saying that – “I believe we’ve made some progress in so much that we have been closing that after-tax wage gap, we are building an economy that is now growing at a faster rate than Australia but it will take us some time to turn that around” –  is not just unhelpful, but totally ignoring the root-cause of what has fractured our society.

Here’s a clue: Money buys goods and serevices. It does not buy a sense of community.

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Quote of the week.

M@TT   #29   2:12pm

John Key, get your stinking paws off Our SOE’s, you damned dirty ape

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Dominion Post Comments

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The Power of National’s “Daddy Statism”

23 November 2011 7 comments

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A constant theme of National’s criticism of the previous Labour government was that Helen Clark’s government was engaging in “Nanny State” politics. The constant refrain was that Labour was controlling more and more of our lives and the repeal of Section 59 (commonly referred to as the “anti smacking law”) was held up as the prime example of state interference in our lives.

Yet, National voted in favour of that same Bill, passing it through the House with near unanimity.

National’s own penchant for state interference in our lives – referred to as “Daddy State”  by some – is actually more pronounced than Labour’s ever was.

The latest example of state interference in the lives of ordinary New Zealanders is this extraordinary story, which appeared in today’s NZ Herald,

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Full Story

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Anne Tolley has stated explicity,

The biggest influence on learning is the teaching, and we want to make sure we have world-class teachers across the board. Making changes to initial teacher training and setting ‘disposition to teach’ criteria is to make sure we get the right people going into teaching.” Source

‘Disposition to teach’ criteria?!

The government intends to determine who is/isn’t suited to teach?

Three points;

  1. If National wants to alienate our teachers and inspire them sufficiently to move to Australia – they are doing a fabulous job at it.  We will have lost our teachers in the next few years, if  National is returned to power.
  2. What will be the next profession where government sets “disposition criteria”? Doctors? Architects? Airline pilots? Ambulance drivers? Firefighters? All Blacks?
  3. Will National set “disposition criteria” for aspiring political candidates “to make sure we get the right people going into politics”?

National’s plan to test individuals for “disposition criteria” is one of the more chilling policies I’ve heard in a long time.

God knows what sort of society National politicians are envisaging – but I want no part of  it. This is downright quasi-fascism. With a huge dose of bizarro-creepiness thrown in for good measure.

If anyone votes for National after this, they need a “disposition criteria”-check carried out on them.

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